Author: karolinearberg

The minimum legal drinking ages across the world

The minimum legal age for drinking alcoholic beverages varies widely between countries. It ranges from 16 years of age to the total prohibition. Join us for a tour around the world to get to know the minimum age for drinking alcohol in the main alcohol consuming countries of the world and to learn about some of its controversies.

The minimum legal drinking age in the world shown by countries

  • The United States – The minimum age is 21 years. However, it causes a bit of a controversy because 18-year-olds can join the army and fight in a war yet they are not allowed to drink alcohol.

 

  • Canada – The laws in this North American country vary by province/territory. Thus, in the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Quebec the minimum age is 18, while in the rest of the provinces and territories the minimum age is 19.

 

  • Brazil – In the country of Cachaça, the minimum age is 18, however, you can vote at 16.

 

  • Latin America – In all the countries of Latin America (Argentina, Peru, Mexico, Chile, Venezuela, Colombia, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Uruguay, Ecuador, Panama, Cuba, Costa Rica, Honduras, Bolivia, Puerto Rico and others) the minimum age for drinking alcoholic beverages is 18. However, there is an exception: in Paraguay, the minimum legal drinking age is 21. The age limit is higher in this country because it has a high rate of harmful alcohol consumption

 

  • United Kingdom – Here, as in most countries, you can only buy alcohol from the age of 18, but the consumption of low-grade beverages such as wine, beer or cider is allowed from the age of 16 when it is in the company of an adult. It is also allowed to drink in public.

 

  • Spain – In the country, which is the third largest producer of wine and other famous distillates such as marc, the law prohibits the consumption of alcoholic beverages until the age of 18. Although there is no national law that prohibits the sale of alcohol to children under 18 years of age, the regulation by Autonomous Community sets the limit of buying alcoholic beverages at 18.

 

  • Italy – One of the other major wine producing countries, along with France and Spain, also sets the age of consumption of alcoholic beverages at 18 years.

 

  • France and Portugal – Two countries that both have a long tradition of wines and good drinks; in both countries the minimum legal drinking ages are 18 years of age, although young people often start drinking from the age of 16 and it is not considered a crime.

 

  • Belgium and the Netherlands – In the beer kingdom, Belgium, the law allows the purchase of wine and beer from the age of 16, and you can legally purchase all types of alcoholic drinks from the age of 18. In the Netherlands the rules are similar, however, the distinction is made by the percentage of alcohol: if you are older than 16 but younger than 18, you can buy drinks with an alcohol content of less than 15%; you must wait until you turn 18 years old to be able to buy drinks with a higher alcohol content.

 

  • Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland – In the Nordic countries regulation makes a clear distinction between the types of alcoholic beverages that can be consumed based on age. Thus, in Denmark, young people between the ages of 16 and 18 can buy wine and other alcoholic beverages with an alcohol content of less than 16.5% and from 18 years of age, there are no limits. In Sweden, you can only buy alcoholic beverages in the Systembolaget (state monopoly) and you must be 20 years old to buy, although it is possible to drink in bars and restaurants from the age of 18. In Norway, the system is like that of Sweden, with the difference that people over 18 can buy wine and beer in state stores (Vinmonopolet). For beverages with a higher alcohol content, you must wait until you turn 20 years old. And in Finland, where wines, spirits and beers are also sold through a public shopping system (Alko), young people over 18 can buy drinks with a maximum content of 22% alcohol, and they must wait until they turn 20 before they can buy beverages with a higher graduation.

 

  • Germany and Austria – In Germany you can buy wine and beer from the age of 16 and from the age of 18 you can buy alcoholic beverages with a higher graduation. In Austria, there are differences between the federated states, which means that in some places the consumption of lower-grade beverages is allowed from the age of 16 and in other places only from the age of 18. The distinctions can be made either by type of drink or by alcohol content.

 

  • Eastern Europe – In the countries of Eastern Europe, the minimum age for drinking alcohol is also 18 years.

 

  • India – The laws in this enigmatic country are also enigmatic; the legal drinking age varies between 18 and 25 years of age, depending on the province in which you are.

 

 

  • Japan – Young Japanese people must wait until they are 20 years old to be able to drink good sake.

 

  • Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Iran and other countries with a Muslim majority – The consumption of alcohol is prohibited in the Muslim world. The Koran uses the term Jamr (“wine”) to refer to any alcoholic substance that causes drunkenness and its intake is considered a serious offence against Islam.

 

  • Sub-Saharan Africa – This is a territorial extension that is so coarse and politically diverse that one cannot speak of a minimum age in a generic way. There are countries like Zimbabwe, Zambia, South Africa or Nigeria where the minimum legal drinking age is 18 years old. However, there are other countries like Togo or Ghana where there is no known minimum age (or at least not from the western point of view).

 

Other curiosities about alcohol consumption

In addition to the minimum legal age for drinking alcohol, the consumption of wine, spirits and beers provides an infinity of curiosities and peculiarities. As we discovered in the post Rarest and most bizarre prohibitions against alcohol around the world, there are a number of peculiarities regarding alcohol consumption, such as the prohibition of riding horses after drinking, or not being allowed to sell cold beer.

As always, we take the opportunity to recommend drinking in moderation. If you are of legal age to consume alcohol, you can enjoy one of these drinks:

India, an Emerging Wine Market

India Wine India and wine Wine consumption

India is an emerging country with a great promising future in many areas. Likewise, the market for wine in India has a great future ahead. This is predicted by a recent report on the wine market in India, conducted by Wine Intelligence in collaboration with Sonal Holland, the only Master of Wine in this country. The study equates it to China.

World Economic Power

For years India has been cementing its place as a strong world economic power and this is one of the reasons that the country is attractive to the wine export market. Also, India is the second most populated country in the world with 1.3 billion people living here.

Imports

India imported around 475,000 boxes of wine in the last 12 months until March 2017. The country has more than 300 wine importers. These numbers were reached despite the high taxes on imported wines, with wine import duties of more than 152%.

A Lot of Young People

The population of the country is relatively young which is another reason for the prediction of an optimistic future. India has more than 800 million people under the age of 35. This suggests that they will be exponential consumers in a few years.

Increasing Wine Production

Other beverages than wine dominate the sales in India and wine has not been produced locally for a long time. This fact sparks the interest of the people who want to consume more wine. Moreover, the study states that between 2010 and 2017 the Indian wine industry recorded a double-digit annual growth rate of more than 14%. This makes wine the fastest growing alcoholic beverage in India.

Mumbai, City of Wine

The study also shows that more wine is consumed in the cities. Specifically, Mumbai represents 32% of the total wine consumption in India, followed by Delhi NCR and its technological suburb Gurugram with 25%; Bangalore 20%; and Pune and Hyderabad with 5% and 3% respectively.

More Studies on the Subject

Research is demonstrating the growing interest in the world of wine in India. And we can also look forward to a more exhaustive and in-depth analysis of the wine consumption in India which is expected to be released this year.

Which Tequila is Better for a Margarita Cocktail?

cocktails spirits tequila

The margarita cocktail is the most popular cocktail made with tequila. If you want to make a classic margarita you will need tequila, lemon juice, ice and Triple Sec (some citrus fruit juices can also be added). Don’t forget the salt on the rim of the glass in which the drink is served.

Despite being a cocktail that can be made with simple preparations the margarita can be created with an infinity of styles and varieties. The types of tequila that can be used for this drink can also be very different from each other. Let’s get to know more about the types of tequila you can use for the delicious margarita cocktail!

White Tequila, the Classic Margarita

There are three types of tequila: tequila blanco (white) or silver, tequila reposado (rested or aged) and tequila añejado (extra aged). Tequila joven or oro (gold) and tequila extra añejo (ultra-aged) – which could be considered as two additional types of tequila – can also be considered two subtypes of the three types of tequila mentioned above.

It might seem strange but not all types of tequila are suitable for preparing a margarita cocktail. The type of distillate usually used to prepare most cocktails that include citrus fruits, as well as the most popular cocktails in general, is white or as neutral as possible.
A margarita cocktail is prepared on the same principles, so the ideal tequila for preparing a good margarita is a white or silver tequila.

What Are the Variations of the Margarita Cocktail?

The basic ingredients for preparing a margarita cocktail are tequila (white, of course), triple sec, lemon juice and ice. However, like all popular cocktails, the margarita comes in many variations. It is often the fruit that we use to mix the drink that varies and not the type of tequila itself. Therefore you might find margaritas with orange juice, strawberry margaritas or even kiwi margaritas.

You might also find variations of margarita that contain brandy, red wine or sake. The variations are limited only by imagination!

The Best Tequilas for a Margarita

Now that we know that white or silver tequila is the ideal tequila for preparing an excellent margarita we present a list of the best tequilas to prepare a classic margarita.

Do you want tequila recommendation for making margaritas? You will find the best below:

 

Jose Cuervo Silver The Rolling Stones: a Silver tequila produced in Mexico with an alcohol content of 38 %.

Tequila Patrón Silver: this is an ultra premium white tequila. It is fresh and sweet.

Don Julio Blanco: a Silver tequila from Mexico that has an alcohol content of 38 %.

Tequila Patron Silver 1L: a Silver tequila from Mexico with an alcohol content of 40 %.

Herradura Silver Tequila: a Silver tequila from Mexico with an alcohol content of 40 %.

Tequila la Tilica Blanco: a silver tequila from Tequila la Tilica distillery in Mexico. It has an alcohol content of 40 %.

Tequila Kah Blanco: a Silver tequila from Mexico containing an alcohol content of 40 %.

 

More Interesting Knowledge About Tequila

Do you love tequila? Do you want to know other curious facts about this popular spirit? Below you will find other articles that are sure to spark your interest!

6 tips to drink tequila
How are tequila and mezcal different?
9 tequilas and mezcals you cannot miss
Tequila leads the boom of luxury spirits

 

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No other than Sauza Tequila produces the Sauza Tequila Silver, a Silver with roots in Mexico with 38% of alcohol strength.

 

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Destilerías Tequila Herradura delivers the Tequila Herradura Añejo (£36.90), a Añejo with origins in Mexico with an alcoholic level of 40% and with the following professionals scores: peñín: 94.

How does wine affect your diet?

The relationship between wine and diet has never been clear at all. On the one hand, we have the Mediterranean diet, which praises the wine and allows us to enjoy one or two drinks a day during the meal. But on the other hand, is the concern for calorie control while drinking alcohol.

It is well known that studies on the Mediterranean diet have shown that these eating habits (and the consumption of wine) have been linked to numerous health benefits, including better cardiac health and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

To gain better knowledge, some wine producers offer nutritional information on their labels, although it is difficult to know exactly how many calories you consume with each sip, and the final count may vary by a lot.

Despite the number of carbohydrates the wines can contain, there are many wines that work within the objectives of low carbohydrate consumption. A good general rule that can help us is that the sweeter the wine, the higher the count of carbohydrates; Dry reds and whites are often excellent low carb options.

There is another side to this: alcohol interrupts the metabolic process. The body cannot store alcohol because it is a toxin, and because it contains nutrients such as proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Instead, it is filtered from the body. Because it cannot be stored, the body prioritizes the processing of alcohol and stops the metabolization of all other nutrients, which means that carbohydrates that have been consumed are less likely to burn and are more likely to break down into sugars which are then stored as fat.

But it is not entirely correct to say that alcohol is fattening unless it is consumed in large quantities. Dietitians say that what makes you gain weight are probably other foods that you eat that can turn into fat when you drink too much. Moreover, they say that when drinking alcohol combined with proteins and vegetables, which are low carbohydrate foods, it is almost impossible to gain weight.

Other nutritionists and doctors point out that many studies have analysed components of a healthy lifestyle… and one of them is the moderate consumption of alcohol.

 

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Casal Mendes Branco

 

 

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Gazela Vinho Verde

Florent Dumeau: “Provence is Provence, it is the rosé capital of the world”

Interview published in issue 4 of Click & Drink with Florent Dumeau, winemaker of the Faculty of Enology of Bordeaux and advisor to wineries and vineyards for more than 15 years. Currently, he collaborates with wineries in 8 countries, mostly in France (Saint Emilion, Pomerol, Provence), Spain (Bodegas Habla, Bodega La Mejorada and a project in La Rioja Alavesa), Italy (Valpolicella, Sicilia), South Africa, and Greece, Turkey, Serbia and Hungary.

He has worked with Bodegas Habla since 2005, and four years ago they started the Rita project; it is a very unique wine that has given us the opportunity for a deeper conversation with Florent about rosés.

How was Rita born? And the project in France?

It is very simple. In 2009, Juan Tirado – president of Bodegas Habla – told me that he admired the great rosés, particularly those from Provence like Château d’Esclans or Domaine d’Ott, and he asked me how we could produce a great rosé here. I replied: “Well, let’s go to Provence!” That’s how it started. After several trips and three years of searching, we finally found a vineyard in a good area of Côte de Provence, facing the mountain Sainte Victoire.

Spain boasts good vineyards and terroirs for producing rosé wines. Why has Bodegas Habla decided to make a wine in Provence?

It is true, Spain has great potential to produce great rosé wines. But Provence is Provence, it is the rosé capital of the world, and I think its chic side and its glamour with Saint Tropez and the other typical towns of the area, fits very well with the philosophy and image of Habla.

And the name, why Rita? It’s funny, different…

It is a question for Valentín, our graphics and artistic creator, but the shape of Rita’s bottle and the exuberant character of the wine remind us of the famous Hollywood sex appeal that Rita Hayworth embodied in the 40s … It is a tribute to the glamour of the time.

Another distinctive feature of Rita is the glass stopper, why was it decided to use it?

It should be noted that the glass stopper allows preserving the wine and its aromas in better conditions than a classic cork. Our first concern is to present the wine to the consumer in perfect conditions, therefore the choice of the stopper has not been purely aesthetic. However, it is true that its aesthetic fits perfectly with Rita.

Turning the conversation to Provence; is it the best area to produce rosé wines?

Surely one of the best; undoubtedly the most famous.

Why do certain rosé wines have such a high price? Do grape varieties, the production process or a reduced production have any influence on this?

First, because the area of Côte de Provence is limited, and as the consumption of rosé wine has skyrocketed in recent years, there is less and less availability in the market and – logically – prices go up.

Furthermore, Côte de Provence has worked extensively on communication and some brands are enjoying great worldwide success today: this is the case of Minuty, Miraval or Whispering Angel by Sacha Lichine.

Where else is Rita sold; in Spain or abroad?

Today Rita is mostly sold in Spain, but sales abroad are growing, particularly on the two American continents.

Do you think that the consumption of rosé wine is a passing fad or a trend that will last over time?

In recent years the consumption of rosé in France has increased between 20% and 35% each year… It is an incredible growth and given the trend and global warming, we can imagine that this development will continue that way for many more years.

Are the rosé wines already considered as good food pairing wines in Spain, or are they still considered more as summer wines?

I believe that there is a tremendous potential for development in Spain. Gradually, I find more and more rosé wines in more restaurants. We have observed the same phenomenon in Italy for a few years. It is difficult to change the habits of consumers: this is where avant-garde wineries such as Habla have an important role to play.

What do you like to pair Rita with? 

I love pairing Rita with seafood, even oysters, but in my opinion, it is a must to try it with white cheeses like Beaufort or Comté.

Provence produces rosés that can be kept for several years. How long can you save a Rita?

The grand rosés from Provence always present freshness and aromatic exuberance. These are characteristics that are lost over time. Its light pale colour also tends to evolve over the years. I am not in favour of aging rosés: to really enjoy them, you should drink them young, I would say bottles between one and three years of age, and the same goes for Rita.

Has Bodegas Habla considered expanding the range of rosés? A Rita Ice, for example? 

I don’t think you will see a Rita Ice… But another rosé in our range, surely yes. We are evaluating it, although it will have to be unique and original, as always… And, at this moment in time, the truth is that it will be difficult to find a place for another rosé to stand side by side with Rita…

 

 TAGS:Habla Rita 2016Habla Rita 2016

Habla Rita 2016

4 Tips For A Healthy Life Drinking Wine

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Every so often new studies documenting the health benefits from drinking wine are published, and almost just as often other studies showing links between diseases and frequent wine consumption appear.

Some of the benefits of enjoying a daily glass of wine include the reduction of cholesterol, stress and diabetes; on the other hand, you also risk the possibility of developing cancer and liver problems. With all this conflicting information it is ok to ask: Can you lead a healthy life when drinking wine? The answer is yes. In the wine itself certain elements are present that are known to be beneficial to health, and so it is advisable to drink a glass of wine a day.

4 tips for a healthy life drinking wine

Moderate consumption of wine does not have to be harmful to your health, indeed, it can even be beneficial if it is included as part of a lifestyle with healthy habits.

  1. Eat a healthy and balanced diet. The most important habit to maintain a healthy lifestyle is to consume a balanced diet with fruits and vegetables being the main food group and make sure your diet also contains sufficient fibre. There are numerous wines that are perfect for pairing with salads and stews. Meat and fish are also important parts of your diet but make sure to choose lean pieces and reduce the intake of animal fats.
  2. Lead an active life. Exercising on a regular basis also contributes to your overall health. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a strenuous sport, the most important thing for improving your health is to exercise regularly.
  3. Reduce stress in your life. Feeling relaxed and avoiding stress is just as important as eating well and exercising. A nice way to try to control the stress is to enjoy good times with friends from time to time, perhaps accompanied with a good bottle of wine.
  4. Drink wine responsibly. Wine can be part of a healthy lifestyle and can even be the perfect excuse to meet friends or to enjoy a meal in pleasant company. Just keep in mind to be aware of how much you drink – the recommendation is a daily glass of wine of 125 ml – and do not drink on an empty stomach.

So, yes, it is possible to lead a healthy life when drinking wine. And, by the way, although it is usually red wine that is mentioned when talking about the benefits of wine, it is worth mentioning that white wine possesses exactly the same positive health effects as red wine.

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Peñascal Rosado

 

 

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Porta 6 2016

5 Great Wines Made By Women

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Traditionally the world of wine has been a world dominated by men. However, slowly (too slowly) women are getting their names recognised in the world of wine. To put a spotlight on the great work done by women in the industry today we are sharing 5 wines made by women. We hope you like them! 

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This balanced and elegant Albariño white wine from Rías Baixas is a safe buy, and behind the wine, we find the winemaker Ana Quintela, who has been with Pazo de Señorans since 1990, and the owner of the winery, Marisol Bueno, a revolutionary of Galician white wines.

 

 

Buy Pazo Señorans 2016

 

 

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María Larrea is the winemaker and technical director of CVNE, one of the most important and largest wineries in Spain. There she produces must-taste wines from Rioja like this Cune Reserva 2011, produced mainly from Tempranillo and it is both soft, pleasant and easy to drink.

 

 

 TAGS:Nita 2015Nita 2015

Nita is the result of the sound suggestion by Meritxell Pallejà, who is responsible for wine, to establish a personal biodynamic wine project. This is a wine with a pronounced fruitiness that reminds us of the minerals of the lands of Priorat. It is also a great RCP wine.

 

 

 TAGS:Viña Tondonia Reserva 2004Viña Tondonia Reserva 2004

Viña Tondonia is one of the most prestigious wineries in Rioja. Here we find María José López de Heredia, great-granddaughter of the founder and one of the most important women on the wine-making scene in Europe. She follows the family tradition with wines such as this great Viña Tondonia Reserva.

 

 

 TAGS:Camí Pesseroles 2011Camí Pesseroles 2011

 

When Sara Pérez was born it was written in the stars that she would grow up to make great wines, and this has been demonstrated through Mas Martinet. In this Priorat winery, Sara utilises the experience passed on from her father and spoils us with great wines such as Camí Pesseroles.

Buy Camí Pesseroles 2011

Wine And Fast Food – A Possible Combination?

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Where is it written that eating pizza or hot dogs cannot be combined with a good wine? Wine does not always have to be accompanied by fancy cuisine as it can successfully be paired with an infinite variety of dishes.

Limitations are not our philosophy. Even the experts say it, like Nicolás Boise, chief sommelier of Mugaritz restaurant, who was quoted in the Spanish Newspaper El País recommending that junk food and wine can be a perfect combination.

But what wines pair well with fast food? It depends on the ingredients in each dish. If you are eating a sausage the choice of wine will depend on the type of sausage, the sauces and the other ingredients in that particular dish.

The basic hot dog (with mustard and ketchup and nothing else) goes well with white wines of the Gewürtzraminer type. If the hot dog also has crispy onions both rosés and sparkling wines will pair very well.

Nowadays it’s pizza and wine! Beer is not the only drink that goes well with pizza; if you prefer having a glass of wine instead we recommend rosé as the best option. Young red wines are also a good pairing. If the pizza has anchovies (something that is currently scarce), it is better to choose a white wine to counteract the flavour, and if you opt for a barbeque pizza you might find that going for a consistent and full-bodied red wine, like a Merlot, is an excellent choice.

Chocolate desserts marry perfectly with many kinds of wines. We already feel quite uncomfortable about the milkshakes found in many fast food establishments, and if we had wine with our dinner we would also like to finish with wine. In fact, you will find that there are some wine and chocolate combinations that maximise the flavours. For these types of desserts, we recommend red wines.

For certain spicy dishes, like kebab, the best combination is made with an intense and stronger wine. And red wines are also preferred when pairing with hamburgers. For some quick tapas, the white and sparkling wines are excellent choices, while taking into account the type of tapas and whether the dish has meat or fish.

 

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Miraval Rosé 2017

 

 

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By Ott Rosé 2016

New Studies Reveal That Red Wine Has Additional Benefits To The Heart

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There are already several proven studies that show that red wine is good for the heart. And now more evidence of its benefits has been discovered. The study comes from the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences of LSU in the United States, where they have developed a new stent that releases red wine antioxidants slowly over time, promoting healing and preventing blood clotting and inflammation.

The people responsible for this development explain that by delivering red wine antioxidants during conventional angioplasty, it may be possible to prevent the build-up of excess tissue and the blood vessel from narrowing again as it heals.

In addition to the stent, they are also in the process of developing a balloon coated with the same compounds to treat blood flow blockages throughout the body called peripheral artery disease. Drug-coated balloons are a relatively new product and are being developed to help interventional cardiologists treat arteries that are difficult to treat with traditional angioplasty and stent treatments.

As mentioned there are more studies that highlight the benefits that red wine possesses to protect the heart. A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that resveratrol was unrelated to rates of heart disease, cancer and death. It was also shown in controlled studies that people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, regardless of the type of drink, tend to have better blood records.

As for a recent study published by the National Institute of Wine Research in Australia, it was shown that drinking wine in moderation reduces the risk of heart disease. People who regularly drink a small amount of red wine, especially if accompanied with food, have a 30% lower risk of heart disease.

 TAGS:Varvaglione Papale Linea Oro Primitivo Di Manduria 2014Varvaglione Papale Linea Oro Primitivo Di Manduria 2014

Varvaglione Papale Linea Oro Primitivo Di Manduria 2014

 

 

 TAGS:Castello di Ama Chianti Classico Ama 2014Castello di Ama Chianti Classico Ama 2014

Castello di Ama Chianti Classico Ama 2014

Toni Coca: Interview With The Winemaker Of Clos Galena

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“We started making ECO wines from the beginning (1991)…; for us, it is more a matter of philosophy than of being commercial.”

When it comes to sustainable viticulture and organic production in the DO Priorat, the Clos Galena winery has positioned itself as a pioneer since its inception. What started as a matter of philosophy for the team behind the Catalan brand has now evolved into a clear trend. And in 2017 one of its wines was represented at the Nobel Prize gala. Here at Uvinum, we got the opportunity to sit down for an interview with Toni Coca, the winemaker at Clos Galena, to learn more about the winery and its successes.

In the past few years there has been a growing trend when it comes to eco-friendly or organic wines. What, according to your opinion, is the reason for this development?

Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of health issues, meaning, we are giving more and more attention to what we eat and drink and the ECO-certified products have greater guarantees.

What is the role of Clos Galena in the organic wine movement in Priorat?

We started making ECO wines from the beginning (1991) in Domini de la Cartoixa; for us, it is more a matter of philosophy than of being commercial. Today there are many producers in Priorat who are making ECO wines, it is a clear trend. We were only a few in the beginning but every year we are growing in numbers.

This year the star of our winery is without a doubt the Formiga de Vellut 2014, the wine that was chosen to be served at the Nobel Prize gala in Stockholm.

How does the Formiga wine connect with this event with regards to the values and ethics represented by the Nobel Prizes?

The Formiga de Vellut wine was chosen for this event through blind tasting, which means that those who have tasted it were looking for an honest wine with multiple nuances, freshness and above all a wine with a Mediterranean character.

What impact have you noticed after being represented at the Nobel Prize dinner?

On the media level, it has had a lot of impact; it has given a lot of visibility to both the wine and the winery.

The director of Clos Galena, Merche Dalmau, has already expressed his pride, saying that “it is a great honor that the Formigas del Vellut 2014 wine was served to harmonize the Nobel dinner”. Being the winemaker and creator, what are your thoughts on the fact that Formigas was invited to the “most intellectual table in the world”?

Without a doubt the importance is remarkable. Primarily because it was chosen and because of this the most cultured minds of today have now tasted it. For me, it is very gratifying to have played my part in this project and to recognise the remarkable work done by many skilled people also working on this project.

Of all the wines of Clos Galena, which one is your favourite?

Actually, although it sounds a little cliché, all the wines we make have their own personality, which connects with your preferences in different ways depending on the moment, but if I have to choose one I would choose the Clos Galena for its complexity, character, and kindness.

Do you have any special recommendations for others to enjoy a wine that you are passionate about?

It is time, especially to connect with wine, to reach a little further than the obvious, emotion and seduction. I think it often depends more on oneself than on the wine.

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Formiga de Vellut 2015

 

 

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Clos Galena 2013