Author: karolinearberg

Where in the World Was Wine First Produced?

wine, history of wine

Russia is the cradle of vodka. Mexico invented tequila. Cuba gave us rum. Scotland is the birthplace of whiskey. But … where does wine originate from? Which country claims the honour of having created wine for the first time? It is doubtful who can be granted the honour of this attribution, and it is not an apolitical issue. Being recognised as the country that discovered such a divine drink would be considered a very beautiful award indeed. However, the origin of wine is not a fact that can be isolated from history. On the contrary, it is inseparable from the historical evolution of agriculture and gastronomy.

The history of wine was born in the Neolithic

All evidence suggests that the wine was born during the Neolithic (stone age). Early remains of what could be wine were found in the Zagros Mountains (in the region now occupied by Armenia, Georgia and Iran), specifically in the Neolithic town of Hajji Firuz Tepe.

It was in this settlement that a vessel dating from 5400 BC was first found. It contained tartaric acid, present in the skin of the grapes, which seems to indicate that it contained wine. In addition, it could be determined that this wine originated from the variety Vitis Vinifera Sylvestris.

The development of trade routes

As cultures around the world evolved many nomadic societies shifted to become sedentary societies. This paved the way for improving the mastery of agricultural techniques. In addition, new professions would appear, and with them the exchange of merchandise and trade. Because of this expanding trade wine from Eastern Europe now found its way to India and China.

Wine in Ancient Egypt

Pictorial representations showing Egyptians harvesting were made during the reign of Udimo, fifth Pharaoh of the 1st dynasty of Egypt (between 2914 BC and 2867 BC). In the beginning, the wine, which could also come from pomegranate juice, was used in religious ceremonies and was called shedeh. During the holiday periods, even the Egyptians of the lower classes had access to wine. Usually wine was reserved for the noble classes and the priesthood.

The wine was kept in sealed amphorae to conserve it. Some of these even became part of the funeral trousseau of the pharaohs. Archaeologists also found thirty large jars of wine when they uncovered Tutankhamun.

In Ancient Egypt, the wine was also used to clean the bodies before and after emptying them during the mummification process.

From Egypt to Greece

It is believed that wine came to the cradle of modern civilization through the mythical islands of Greece in the eastern Mediterranean given the geographical proximity of Crete with Egypt and Phoenicia.

Wine had become a habitual drink around 700 BC. It had become so popular that it was even assigned a god of its own: Dionysus. People would usually drink the wine mixed with water due to the high alcoholic strength of the wines. It was only consumed in its pure form during rituals and religious celebrations.

The cultivation of the wine by the Mediterranean countries expanded in the hands of the Greek culture. And the first documentation about wine also comes from ancient Greece: under the title Works and Days, the Greek poet Hesiod (8th century BC) described the harvesting and pressing of grapes, how wine was consumed – with water – and its conservation – in goat skins.

Wine in the Roman Empire

Towards 200 BC the wine arrived in the peninsula of Italy and even the southern lands were beginning to be known as Oenotria (“grape land”), given the ease of cultivation of the vine. The Roman Empire had a fundamental role in the dissemination of wine and the spread of grape cultivation in Europe. Vines were planted in latitudes as far as Normandy, Flanders or the Baltic countries. It was a glorious time for wine, and we owe our thanks to the technique of grafting on wines, among others.

The Romans also began using wooden barrels to store and transport the wine. It was a method that came from northern Europe where it was being used for the storage of other beverages.

With the fall of the Roman Empire, the Christian monasteries would continue with the cultivation of the vine during the Middle Ages to obtain wines for the consecration of the mass.

Wine in the New World

The introduction of the vine and wine in what we call the New World was at the hands of the Jesuits and the conquerors. It was necessary to guarantee the supply of wine in the religious services. Little by little they were importing and planting vines, a process that was accelerated with the rootstocks. In just under 100 years, during the sixteenth century, wine arrived in Mexico and Baja California to further reach Peru, Chile and Argentina.

More history and curiosities about wine

On the Uvinum Blog, we love writing, learning, and spreading information about wine. If you want to continue reading articles about the history and curiosities of wine, we are sharing some links below that will surely interest you. Cheers!

5 Great Wine Bars in Lisbon

bars, drinking wine, Portuguese food, wine tourism, Portugal, Portuguese wine

Recently Lisbon has transformed into a must-visit city. Some of its main tourist attractions are amazing cuisine, art, and streets full of life. But we should not forget that Portugal is also a country that makes great wines. Therefore, we suggest that you visit some of the best wine bars in Lisbon. Find your favourite and note it down for your next trip to the Portuguese capital!

Vestigius

Vestigius is located in an old winery and it is much more than just a wine bar: it offers an extensive program of cultural events, giving you the opportunity to spend a pleasant time while enjoying good wines and wonderful dishes of both national and international cuisine.
You will find Vestigius in the area around Cais do Sodré. The bar has a privileged view of the Tagus River, with a fabulous esplanade area to enjoy the outdoors. It is an ideal place for cultural exchange and ideas over a glass of good wine or a cocktail.

The Old Pharmacy Wine Bar

What would a pharmacy and wine have in common? Some might say that both can provide relief for sorrows and pains… But in the case of The Old Pharmacy Wine Bar, it means that an old pharmacy was lovingly converted into a wine bar. This charming place offers some 200 different wines of Portuguese origin. You can also order a selection of cheeses, hams and other tasty snacks to perfectly accompany the wine you have chosen

On top of that, it is also one of the most striking wine bars in Lisbon. You will no doubt find the opportunity to immerse yourself in the exciting world of Portuguese wines. The Old Pharmacy Wine Bar also offers the opportunity to enjoy a coffee or a tea should your heart desire something less intoxicating…

Winebar do Castelo

If you are a true wine lover, this is one of the must-visit wine bars in Lisbon. You will find Winebar do Castelo on one of the hills of the city, Castelo de São Jorge, located in the historic centre. The interesting selection of wines is usually rotated and the vintage port wines stand out.

Winebar do Castelo also offers another attraction: the guided tastings give you an excellent opportunity to learn more about Portuguese wines. Of course, the bar also offers dishes based on cheeses and delicatessen to accompany the wine. Highly recommended!

By the Wine

It is one of the best-known wine bars in the city, as it is the flagship store of José Maria da Fonseca, one of the most present wine companies in the country. When you visit By the Wine, you will find all the wines from this winery’s portfolio as well as a wide selection of tapas, including Guijuelo ham.

By the Wine lies in the heart of Lisbon, but this is not the only selling point. You will also be captivated by the interior architecture of the place. This bar is an excellent option if you want to eat and drink good wines in a pleasant atmosphere.

Tasca do Chico

We would never forget to mention Fado in this selection of wine bars in Lisbon. Tasca do Chico is a tavern where you can eat, drink wine and, above all, listen to Fado.

It is an intimate and special place, although somewhat small. It is one of the best places to drink a glass of wine while listening to the melancholic rhythm of a music genre that, like good wine, reaches the soul.

 TAGS:Gazela Vinho Verde

Gazela Vinho Verde

The Gazela Vinho Verde: a white wine from Vinho Verde produced by Gazela vinified from alvarinho and shows an alcoholic strength of 9%. The Gazela Vinho Verde is the ideal white to combine with salmon salad and crab.  

 
 TAGS:Azul Portugal Dão 2013

Azul Portugal Dão 2013

The winery Azul Portugal elaborates this Azul Portugal Dão 2013, a red wine from Dao that contains grapes of 2013 and shows an alcoholic content of 13%.  

4 Low-Calorie Cocktails to Help You Stay in Shape

low-calorie, spritzer, vodka soda, martini, mojito

Do you want to lose some weight but without denying yourself the tasty drink after work? Don’t worry, we here at Uvinum are very familiar with this dilemma. That’s why we present 4 cocktails with a low-calorie count, so you can enjoy Saturday night with your friends and, at the same time, preserve your figure.

1. Spritzer – The Austrian National Drink

The Spritzer, also known as Weinschorle in Germany, is probably the most popular long drink in Austria and is enjoyed at any time of the year. It is a drink made from wine mixed with mineral water and decorated with a slice of lemon. You should use fairly young white wine from the Grüner Veltliner, Weißburgunder or Chardonnay grape varieties in this popular drink. The ratio of wine to mineral water should be 1:1. This refreshing drink contains just 58 calories per 100ml.

There is yet another advantage to this all-purpose drink: you will minimise the risk of a hangover the next day due to the high content of water in the drink. Enjoy this Austrian classic!

2. Vodka Soda – Simple and Low in Calories

Water + Vodka = Vodka Soda

Of course, it’s not that simple! This cocktail must be mixed properly. First, fill a glass with ice cubes and then add the ingredients. For this low-calorie drink, you need 3 parts of sparkling water and 1 part of vodka. Once it is mixed, decorate the glass with a lime. This cocktail contains only 22 calories per 100ml.

Are you not sure which vodka to use to make this cocktail? We offer you a unique selection on our blog.

3. Martini – Shaken or Stirred?

We all know this famous drink from the James Bond movies, but did you also know that this cocktail belongs in the category of low-calorie alcoholic beverages? The Martini cocktail is a short drink, often enjoyed as an aperitif, and it is usually prepared with vermouth and gin.

One of the best-known Martini cocktails is the Dry Martini. This cocktail is made with London Dry Gin and just a tiny splash of vermouth, as little as possible. And you should never forget the olive that decorates the glass.

Every 100 ml of a Martini Cocktail contains a mere 140 calories! Now you know why James Bond has such a perfect body.

4. Mojito – Greetings from Cuba

The mojito is a low-calorie alternative, unlike many other Cuban cocktails. The mojito was invented in Havana, and this cocktail consists of 5 basic ingredients: white rum, sugar (traditionally sugarcane juice), lemon juice, soda and mint. The most important element in the preparation of a mojito is undoubtedly the rum. Uvinum offers a selection of the best rums for your mojito.

The amount of mineral water in this Cuban drink makes it a low-calorie cocktail. ‘The green gold of Cuba’ has only 71 calories per 100ml.

You can find a unique selection of low-calorie options. So, you no longer need to worry about the temptations at the next party. We hope you have fun when trying and enjoying these low-calorie cocktails. And, remember, drink in moderation!

 TAGS:Absolut Vodka 1L

Absolut Vodka 1L

The Absolut Vodka 1L by The Absolut Company: a Neutral with roots in Sweden with an alcoholic content of 40%.

 

 TAGS:Martini Bianco 1L

Martini Bianco 1L

The Martini Bianco 1L  by Martini & Rossi: a vermouth with roots in Italy with 15% of alcohol.

The Most Interesting Wine and Food Museums in the World

museums wines red wines wine tourism

 

You shouldn’t miss these food and wine museums if you are going travelling or are planning an exciting wine route. Take note and write them down on your bucket list. And remember to enjoy the wine!

Vivanco Museum of Wine Culture, Spain

One of the most interesting and oldest wine museums in the world is the Vivanco Museum of Wine Culture in Spain. The museum is catalogued as the best wine museum in the world by the World Tourism Organisation-UN. The place allows you to travel through no less than 8,000 years of history with 20,000 works of art. You will find authentic archaeological pieces with hundreds of years of history. But you will also be able to enjoy more modern works by creators such as Picasso, Sorolla, Juan Gris, Chillida, Barceló, Genovés, or Warhol. The museum also allows you to enter the winery, do tastings and attend conferences and workshops. Here you will see 220 varieties of wine from around the world.

Pleven Wine Museum, Bulgaria

The museum is located inside a cave in the park of Kaylaka in Bulgaria. It contains many objects related to the viticultural tradition of the city. The park also boasts beautiful flora and vegetation. As in many other museums of this type, of course, you will also find the opportunity to taste their wines.

The Living Museum of Gingerbread, Poland

This museum does not focus on wine, but it contains many curiosities. The Living Museum of Gingerbread in Poland (Muzeum Piernika) offers visitors a glimpse of the rituals and traditions involved in the making of gingerbread. The place features activities, temporary exhibitions, interactive exhibitions, and you will also be able to make your own gingerbread.

Frietmuseum in Bruges, Belgium

You may not know that french fries originated in Belgium. In Bruges, you can find a museum that is divided into three parts dedicated to the good old chip. The history of the chip is exhibited along 400 antique objects on display. The visit also includes an opportunity at the end to taste the chips

Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin

This museum could not be located anywhere else seeing that the currywurst was invented in Berlin. Fine slices of currywurst with curry ketchup. The museum showcases how this sausage became so popular, thanks to interactive exhibits and much more. Don’t forget to taste the sausages at the various street stands in the city.

The minimum legal drinking ages across the world

The minimum legal age for drinking alcoholic beverages varies widely between countries. It ranges from 16 years of age to the total prohibition. Join us for a tour around the world to get to know the minimum age for drinking alcohol in the main alcohol consuming countries of the world and to learn about some of its controversies.

The minimum legal drinking age in the world shown by countries

  • The United States – The minimum age is 21 years. However, it causes a bit of a controversy because 18-year-olds can join the army and fight in a war yet they are not allowed to drink alcohol.

 

  • Canada – The laws in this North American country vary by province/territory. Thus, in the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Quebec the minimum age is 18, while in the rest of the provinces and territories the minimum age is 19.

 

  • Brazil – In the country of Cachaça, the minimum age is 18, however, you can vote at 16.

 

  • Latin America – In all the countries of Latin America (Argentina, Peru, Mexico, Chile, Venezuela, Colombia, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Uruguay, Ecuador, Panama, Cuba, Costa Rica, Honduras, Bolivia, Puerto Rico and others) the minimum age for drinking alcoholic beverages is 18. However, there is an exception: in Paraguay, the minimum legal drinking age is 21. The age limit is higher in this country because it has a high rate of harmful alcohol consumption

 

  • United Kingdom – Here, as in most countries, you can only buy alcohol from the age of 18, but the consumption of low-grade beverages such as wine, beer or cider is allowed from the age of 16 when it is in the company of an adult. It is also allowed to drink in public.

 

  • Spain – In the country, which is the third largest producer of wine and other famous distillates such as marc, the law prohibits the consumption of alcoholic beverages until the age of 18. Although there is no national law that prohibits the sale of alcohol to children under 18 years of age, the regulation by Autonomous Community sets the limit of buying alcoholic beverages at 18.

 

  • Italy – One of the other major wine producing countries, along with France and Spain, also sets the age of consumption of alcoholic beverages at 18 years.

 

  • France and Portugal – Two countries that both have a long tradition of wines and good drinks; in both countries the minimum legal drinking ages are 18 years of age, although young people often start drinking from the age of 16 and it is not considered a crime.

 

  • Belgium and the Netherlands – In the beer kingdom, Belgium, the law allows the purchase of wine and beer from the age of 16, and you can legally purchase all types of alcoholic drinks from the age of 18. In the Netherlands the rules are similar, however, the distinction is made by the percentage of alcohol: if you are older than 16 but younger than 18, you can buy drinks with an alcohol content of less than 15%; you must wait until you turn 18 years old to be able to buy drinks with a higher alcohol content.

 

  • Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland – In the Nordic countries regulation makes a clear distinction between the types of alcoholic beverages that can be consumed based on age. Thus, in Denmark, young people between the ages of 16 and 18 can buy wine and other alcoholic beverages with an alcohol content of less than 16.5% and from 18 years of age, there are no limits. In Sweden, you can only buy alcoholic beverages in the Systembolaget (state monopoly) and you must be 20 years old to buy, although it is possible to drink in bars and restaurants from the age of 18. In Norway, the system is like that of Sweden, with the difference that people over 18 can buy wine and beer in state stores (Vinmonopolet). For beverages with a higher alcohol content, you must wait until you turn 20 years old. And in Finland, where wines, spirits and beers are also sold through a public shopping system (Alko), young people over 18 can buy drinks with a maximum content of 22% alcohol, and they must wait until they turn 20 before they can buy beverages with a higher graduation.

 

  • Germany and Austria – In Germany you can buy wine and beer from the age of 16 and from the age of 18 you can buy alcoholic beverages with a higher graduation. In Austria, there are differences between the federated states, which means that in some places the consumption of lower-grade beverages is allowed from the age of 16 and in other places only from the age of 18. The distinctions can be made either by type of drink or by alcohol content.

 

  • Eastern Europe – In the countries of Eastern Europe, the minimum age for drinking alcohol is also 18 years.

 

  • India – The laws in this enigmatic country are also enigmatic; the legal drinking age varies between 18 and 25 years of age, depending on the province in which you are.

 

 

  • Japan – Young Japanese people must wait until they are 20 years old to be able to drink good sake.

 

  • Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Iran and other countries with a Muslim majority – The consumption of alcohol is prohibited in the Muslim world. The Koran uses the term Jamr (“wine”) to refer to any alcoholic substance that causes drunkenness and its intake is considered a serious offence against Islam.

 

  • Sub-Saharan Africa – This is a territorial extension that is so coarse and politically diverse that one cannot speak of a minimum age in a generic way. There are countries like Zimbabwe, Zambia, South Africa or Nigeria where the minimum legal drinking age is 18 years old. However, there are other countries like Togo or Ghana where there is no known minimum age (or at least not from the western point of view).

 

Other curiosities about alcohol consumption

In addition to the minimum legal age for drinking alcohol, the consumption of wine, spirits and beers provides an infinity of curiosities and peculiarities. As we discovered in the post Rarest and most bizarre prohibitions against alcohol around the world, there are a number of peculiarities regarding alcohol consumption, such as the prohibition of riding horses after drinking, or not being allowed to sell cold beer.

As always, we take the opportunity to recommend drinking in moderation. If you are of legal age to consume alcohol, you can enjoy one of these drinks:

India, an Emerging Wine Market

India Wine India and wine Wine consumption

India is an emerging country with a great promising future in many areas. Likewise, the market for wine in India has a great future ahead. This is predicted by a recent report on the wine market in India, conducted by Wine Intelligence in collaboration with Sonal Holland, the only Master of Wine in this country. The study equates it to China.

World Economic Power

For years India has been cementing its place as a strong world economic power and this is one of the reasons that the country is attractive to the wine export market. Also, India is the second most populated country in the world with 1.3 billion people living here.

Imports

India imported around 475,000 boxes of wine in the last 12 months until March 2017. The country has more than 300 wine importers. These numbers were reached despite the high taxes on imported wines, with wine import duties of more than 152%.

A Lot of Young People

The population of the country is relatively young which is another reason for the prediction of an optimistic future. India has more than 800 million people under the age of 35. This suggests that they will be exponential consumers in a few years.

Increasing Wine Production

Other beverages than wine dominate the sales in India and wine has not been produced locally for a long time. This fact sparks the interest of the people who want to consume more wine. Moreover, the study states that between 2010 and 2017 the Indian wine industry recorded a double-digit annual growth rate of more than 14%. This makes wine the fastest growing alcoholic beverage in India.

Mumbai, City of Wine

The study also shows that more wine is consumed in the cities. Specifically, Mumbai represents 32% of the total wine consumption in India, followed by Delhi NCR and its technological suburb Gurugram with 25%; Bangalore 20%; and Pune and Hyderabad with 5% and 3% respectively.

More Studies on the Subject

Research is demonstrating the growing interest in the world of wine in India. And we can also look forward to a more exhaustive and in-depth analysis of the wine consumption in India which is expected to be released this year.

Which Tequila is Better for a Margarita Cocktail?

cocktails spirits tequila

The margarita cocktail is the most popular cocktail made with tequila. If you want to make a classic margarita you will need tequila, lemon juice, ice and Triple Sec (some citrus fruit juices can also be added). Don’t forget the salt on the rim of the glass in which the drink is served.

Despite being a cocktail that can be made with simple preparations the margarita can be created with an infinity of styles and varieties. The types of tequila that can be used for this drink can also be very different from each other. Let’s get to know more about the types of tequila you can use for the delicious margarita cocktail!

White Tequila, the Classic Margarita

There are three types of tequila: tequila blanco (white) or silver, tequila reposado (rested or aged) and tequila añejado (extra aged). Tequila joven or oro (gold) and tequila extra añejo (ultra-aged) – which could be considered as two additional types of tequila – can also be considered two subtypes of the three types of tequila mentioned above.

It might seem strange but not all types of tequila are suitable for preparing a margarita cocktail. The type of distillate usually used to prepare most cocktails that include citrus fruits, as well as the most popular cocktails in general, is white or as neutral as possible.
A margarita cocktail is prepared on the same principles, so the ideal tequila for preparing a good margarita is a white or silver tequila.

What Are the Variations of the Margarita Cocktail?

The basic ingredients for preparing a margarita cocktail are tequila (white, of course), triple sec, lemon juice and ice. However, like all popular cocktails, the margarita comes in many variations. It is often the fruit that we use to mix the drink that varies and not the type of tequila itself. Therefore you might find margaritas with orange juice, strawberry margaritas or even kiwi margaritas.

You might also find variations of margarita that contain brandy, red wine or sake. The variations are limited only by imagination!

The Best Tequilas for a Margarita

Now that we know that white or silver tequila is the ideal tequila for preparing an excellent margarita we present a list of the best tequilas to prepare a classic margarita.

Do you want tequila recommendation for making margaritas? You will find the best below:

 

Jose Cuervo Silver The Rolling Stones: a Silver tequila produced in Mexico with an alcohol content of 38 %.

Tequila Patrón Silver: this is an ultra premium white tequila. It is fresh and sweet.

Don Julio Blanco: a Silver tequila from Mexico that has an alcohol content of 38 %.

Tequila Patron Silver 1L: a Silver tequila from Mexico with an alcohol content of 40 %.

Herradura Silver Tequila: a Silver tequila from Mexico with an alcohol content of 40 %.

Tequila la Tilica Blanco: a silver tequila from Tequila la Tilica distillery in Mexico. It has an alcohol content of 40 %.

Tequila Kah Blanco: a Silver tequila from Mexico containing an alcohol content of 40 %.

 

More Interesting Knowledge About Tequila

Do you love tequila? Do you want to know other curious facts about this popular spirit? Below you will find other articles that are sure to spark your interest!

6 tips to drink tequila
How are tequila and mezcal different?
9 tequilas and mezcals you cannot miss
Tequila leads the boom of luxury spirits

 

 TAGS:Sauza Tequila SilverSauza Tequila Silver

No other than Sauza Tequila produces the Sauza Tequila Silver, a Silver with roots in Mexico with 38% of alcohol strength.

 

 TAGS:Tequila Herradura AñejoTequila Herradura Añejo


Destilerías Tequila Herradura delivers the Tequila Herradura Añejo (£36.90), a Añejo with origins in Mexico with an alcoholic level of 40% and with the following professionals scores: peñín: 94.

How does wine affect your diet?

The relationship between wine and diet has never been clear at all. On the one hand, we have the Mediterranean diet, which praises the wine and allows us to enjoy one or two drinks a day during the meal. But on the other hand, is the concern for calorie control while drinking alcohol.

It is well known that studies on the Mediterranean diet have shown that these eating habits (and the consumption of wine) have been linked to numerous health benefits, including better cardiac health and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

To gain better knowledge, some wine producers offer nutritional information on their labels, although it is difficult to know exactly how many calories you consume with each sip, and the final count may vary by a lot.

Despite the number of carbohydrates the wines can contain, there are many wines that work within the objectives of low carbohydrate consumption. A good general rule that can help us is that the sweeter the wine, the higher the count of carbohydrates; Dry reds and whites are often excellent low carb options.

There is another side to this: alcohol interrupts the metabolic process. The body cannot store alcohol because it is a toxin, and because it contains nutrients such as proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Instead, it is filtered from the body. Because it cannot be stored, the body prioritizes the processing of alcohol and stops the metabolization of all other nutrients, which means that carbohydrates that have been consumed are less likely to burn and are more likely to break down into sugars which are then stored as fat.

But it is not entirely correct to say that alcohol is fattening unless it is consumed in large quantities. Dietitians say that what makes you gain weight are probably other foods that you eat that can turn into fat when you drink too much. Moreover, they say that when drinking alcohol combined with proteins and vegetables, which are low carbohydrate foods, it is almost impossible to gain weight.

Other nutritionists and doctors point out that many studies have analysed components of a healthy lifestyle… and one of them is the moderate consumption of alcohol.

 

 TAGS:Casal Mendes BrancoCasal Mendes Branco

Casal Mendes Branco

 

 

 TAGS:Gazela Vinho VerdeGazela Vinho Verde

Gazela Vinho Verde

Florent Dumeau: “Provence is Provence, it is the rosé capital of the world”

Interview published in issue 4 of Click & Drink with Florent Dumeau, winemaker of the Faculty of Enology of Bordeaux and advisor to wineries and vineyards for more than 15 years. Currently, he collaborates with wineries in 8 countries, mostly in France (Saint Emilion, Pomerol, Provence), Spain (Bodegas Habla, Bodega La Mejorada and a project in La Rioja Alavesa), Italy (Valpolicella, Sicilia), South Africa, and Greece, Turkey, Serbia and Hungary.

He has worked with Bodegas Habla since 2005, and four years ago they started the Rita project; it is a very unique wine that has given us the opportunity for a deeper conversation with Florent about rosés.

How was Rita born? And the project in France?

It is very simple. In 2009, Juan Tirado – president of Bodegas Habla – told me that he admired the great rosés, particularly those from Provence like Château d’Esclans or Domaine d’Ott, and he asked me how we could produce a great rosé here. I replied: “Well, let’s go to Provence!” That’s how it started. After several trips and three years of searching, we finally found a vineyard in a good area of Côte de Provence, facing the mountain Sainte Victoire.

Spain boasts good vineyards and terroirs for producing rosé wines. Why has Bodegas Habla decided to make a wine in Provence?

It is true, Spain has great potential to produce great rosé wines. But Provence is Provence, it is the rosé capital of the world, and I think its chic side and its glamour with Saint Tropez and the other typical towns of the area, fits very well with the philosophy and image of Habla.

And the name, why Rita? It’s funny, different…

It is a question for Valentín, our graphics and artistic creator, but the shape of Rita’s bottle and the exuberant character of the wine remind us of the famous Hollywood sex appeal that Rita Hayworth embodied in the 40s … It is a tribute to the glamour of the time.

Another distinctive feature of Rita is the glass stopper, why was it decided to use it?

It should be noted that the glass stopper allows preserving the wine and its aromas in better conditions than a classic cork. Our first concern is to present the wine to the consumer in perfect conditions, therefore the choice of the stopper has not been purely aesthetic. However, it is true that its aesthetic fits perfectly with Rita.

Turning the conversation to Provence; is it the best area to produce rosé wines?

Surely one of the best; undoubtedly the most famous.

Why do certain rosé wines have such a high price? Do grape varieties, the production process or a reduced production have any influence on this?

First, because the area of Côte de Provence is limited, and as the consumption of rosé wine has skyrocketed in recent years, there is less and less availability in the market and – logically – prices go up.

Furthermore, Côte de Provence has worked extensively on communication and some brands are enjoying great worldwide success today: this is the case of Minuty, Miraval or Whispering Angel by Sacha Lichine.

Where else is Rita sold; in Spain or abroad?

Today Rita is mostly sold in Spain, but sales abroad are growing, particularly on the two American continents.

Do you think that the consumption of rosé wine is a passing fad or a trend that will last over time?

In recent years the consumption of rosé in France has increased between 20% and 35% each year… It is an incredible growth and given the trend and global warming, we can imagine that this development will continue that way for many more years.

Are the rosé wines already considered as good food pairing wines in Spain, or are they still considered more as summer wines?

I believe that there is a tremendous potential for development in Spain. Gradually, I find more and more rosé wines in more restaurants. We have observed the same phenomenon in Italy for a few years. It is difficult to change the habits of consumers: this is where avant-garde wineries such as Habla have an important role to play.

What do you like to pair Rita with? 

I love pairing Rita with seafood, even oysters, but in my opinion, it is a must to try it with white cheeses like Beaufort or Comté.

Provence produces rosés that can be kept for several years. How long can you save a Rita?

The grand rosés from Provence always present freshness and aromatic exuberance. These are characteristics that are lost over time. Its light pale colour also tends to evolve over the years. I am not in favour of aging rosés: to really enjoy them, you should drink them young, I would say bottles between one and three years of age, and the same goes for Rita.

Has Bodegas Habla considered expanding the range of rosés? A Rita Ice, for example? 

I don’t think you will see a Rita Ice… But another rosé in our range, surely yes. We are evaluating it, although it will have to be unique and original, as always… And, at this moment in time, the truth is that it will be difficult to find a place for another rosé to stand side by side with Rita…

 

 TAGS:Habla Rita 2016Habla Rita 2016

Habla Rita 2016

4 Tips For A Healthy Life Drinking Wine

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Every so often new studies documenting the health benefits from drinking wine are published, and almost just as often other studies showing links between diseases and frequent wine consumption appear.

Some of the benefits of enjoying a daily glass of wine include the reduction of cholesterol, stress and diabetes; on the other hand, you also risk the possibility of developing cancer and liver problems. With all this conflicting information it is ok to ask: Can you lead a healthy life when drinking wine? The answer is yes. In the wine itself certain elements are present that are known to be beneficial to health, and so it is advisable to drink a glass of wine a day.

4 tips for a healthy life drinking wine

Moderate consumption of wine does not have to be harmful to your health, indeed, it can even be beneficial if it is included as part of a lifestyle with healthy habits.

  1. Eat a healthy and balanced diet. The most important habit to maintain a healthy lifestyle is to consume a balanced diet with fruits and vegetables being the main food group and make sure your diet also contains sufficient fibre. There are numerous wines that are perfect for pairing with salads and stews. Meat and fish are also important parts of your diet but make sure to choose lean pieces and reduce the intake of animal fats.
  2. Lead an active life. Exercising on a regular basis also contributes to your overall health. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a strenuous sport, the most important thing for improving your health is to exercise regularly.
  3. Reduce stress in your life. Feeling relaxed and avoiding stress is just as important as eating well and exercising. A nice way to try to control the stress is to enjoy good times with friends from time to time, perhaps accompanied with a good bottle of wine.
  4. Drink wine responsibly. Wine can be part of a healthy lifestyle and can even be the perfect excuse to meet friends or to enjoy a meal in pleasant company. Just keep in mind to be aware of how much you drink – the recommendation is a daily glass of wine of 125 ml – and do not drink on an empty stomach.

So, yes, it is possible to lead a healthy life when drinking wine. And, by the way, although it is usually red wine that is mentioned when talking about the benefits of wine, it is worth mentioning that white wine possesses exactly the same positive health effects as red wine.

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