Wine Production Under Strain

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The International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) reported that this year’s wine production had been at its lowest since the 1960’s. Indeed, the harvest saw an 8% fall in production with only 246.7 million hectolitres. Moreover, despite a growing wine consumption among different population types, the production decreases steadily.

According to the OIV, climate change is one of the main reasons for these poor figures and it blames warmer autumns and longer frost periods which impede the grape’s development.

Yet, this does not cause a drop in consumption because there is enough stock (e.g. only in France, there are 154 million hectolitres in stock) nor a surge in price as exports are thriving. According to OIV experts, cheaper wines may slightly increase their price, but high-end wines will maintain themselves.

Climate change is especially affecting countries such as France, Italy and Spain. We witnessed it with this year’s vintage, which was ahead of schedule and yielded a lower production: 35.7 million hectolitres of wine and must in Spain.

Nonetheless, the wine world remains dynamic thanks to all kinds of events: wine tourism is flourishing and exports are rising.

More data on low production were published by the Directorate General for Agriculture of the European Commission which predicted that next year’s wine production would have an estimate of just 145.1 million hectolitres, which is 14.4% lower and over 24 million hectolitres less than last season.

 TAGS:Domaine Du Tariquet Premières Grives 2016Domaine Du Tariquet Premières Grives 2016

Domaine Du Tariquet Premières Grives 2016, a white wine from Côtes de Gascogne vinified with gros manseng.

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 TAGS:Casa Castillo Monastrell 2015

Casa Castillo Monastrell 2015

Casa Castillo Monastrell 2015  is a red wine from Jumilla produced by Propiedad Vitícola Casa Castillo.

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Tasty Punch Recipes to Enjoy in Autumn

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As autumn unfolds, bringing along its proverbial brown leaves and icy winds, people start feeling the bites of the cold and need something to warm up their spirit and their body. If you like both hot drinks and alcoholic beverages, you will surely love a flavourful punch. Here are some ideas to properly enjoy chilly days:

Warm and Spicy Autumn Punch

Ingredients:

  • 2 oranges
  • 8 whole cloves
  • 6 cups apple juice
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice 
  • 2 1/4 cups pineapple juice

Preparation:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Stud the whole oranges with cloves, and bake for 30 minutes.
  2. In a large saucepan, put the apple juice with the cinnamon stick. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium, and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and stir in the nutmeg, honey, lemon juice, and pineapple juice.
  3. Serve hot in a punch bowl with the 2 clove-studded baked oranges floating on top.

Sparkling Punch

Ingredients:

  • 2 lemons
  • 3 large oranges
  • 1 (6 ounces) can frozen lemonade concentrate 
  • 1 litre of club soda
  • 2 (750 millilitres) bottles sparkling apple cider
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 2 trays of ice cubes

Preparation:

  1. Thinly slice the lemons and oranges and place them in a large punch bowl.
  2. Pour in the thawed lemonade.
  3. Gently stir in the club soda and the sparkling apple cider.
  4. Add sugar to taste.
  5. Add ice cubes.

Wassail Punch

Ingredients:

  • 2 quarts apple cider
  • 2 cups orange juice
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 12 whole cloves
  • 4 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 pinch ground ginger

Preparation:

  1. In a slow-cooker or a large pot over low heat, combine apple cider, orange juice and lemon juice.
  2. Season with cloves, ginger and nutmeg.
  3. Bring to a simmer. If using a slow cooker, allow it to simmer all day.
  4. Serve hot.

Luscious Slush Punch

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups white sugar
  • 6 cups water
  • 2 (3 ounces) packages strawberry flavoured
  • 1 (46 fluid ounce) can pineapple juice
  • 2/3 cup lemon juice
  • 1-quart orange juice
  • 2 (2 litres) bottles lemon-lime flavoured carbonated beverage

Preparation:

  1. Bring the sugar, water, and strawberry flavoured gelatin to a boil in a large saucepan; boil for 3 minutes.
  2. Stir in the pineapple juice, lemon juice, and orange juice. Divide mixture into 2 separate containers and freeze.
  3. Combine the contents of 1 container with 1 bottle of the lemon-lime flavoured carbonated beverage in a punch bowl; stir until slushy.
  4. Repeat with remaining portions as needed.

TAGS:Vigneti del Salento Muri Primitivo 2016Vigneti del Salento Muri Primitivo 2016

Vigneti del Salento Muri Primitivo 2016, a red wine from the region of Puglia that is based on the best of Primitivo.

 

TAGS:DiamanteDiamante

Diamante, a white wine from Rioja that is based on Viura, Malvasía and Macabeo grapes.

 

Wine’s Importance in the Mediterranean Diet

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The Mediterranean diet’s multiple benefits for the body are well-known. Indeed, it prevents heart-related diseases, eliminates bad cholesterol and provides nutrients needed to develop an optimum mind and body.

This diet includes wine, both at lunch and dinner since -consumed with moderation- it is a healthy beverage that also brings many advantages.

The Mediterranean Diet Foundation admits that “wine is a beverage traditionally associated with both beneficial and harmful effects on health. What determines the balance tilting to one side or the other is the daily amount consumed and the nutritional pattern followed”. What’s more, they recommend the words of Ramón Estruch, one of the leaders of the Predimed research group of the Center for Biomedical Research in Network Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), who states that “the greatest benefits are achieved when consumption stays moderate and within a healthy dietary pattern as the Mediterranean diet”.

So, the importance of wine in this diet is relevant, as is the amount. The recommended drinking amount for men is a maximum of three glasses per day, and one glass and a half for women.

The guide of the Mediterranean Diet Foundation establishes that water is the beverage par excellence in the Mediterranean diet, whereas wine should be consumed in moderation and only during meals. They add that wine is a traditional food in the diet that can have beneficial effects for health by consuming it in moderation and in the context of a balanced diet.

These beverages, such as wine, should be combined with local, seasonal products, vegetables, cereals, fish, red meats (in moderation), fresh fruit, dairy, nuts and cooking with olive oil.

Finally, daily exercise remains one of the fundamentals that complete the diet and enable us to enjoy the tasty Mediterranean food guilt-free. 

 TAGS:Farnese Fantini Sangiovese Terre Di Chieti 2016Farnese Fantini Sangiovese Terre Di Chieti 2016

Farnese Fantini Sangiovese Terre Di Chieti 2016 is young and powerful Sangiovese red wine that perfectly reflects the terroir’s strong character.

 

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 TAGS:Tarima Monastrell 2015Tarima Monastrell 2015

Tarima Monastrell 2015, a delightful Verdejo wine that is easy to drink. It is unique thanks to its tropical and fruity aromas.

 

Best Vodka Cocktails for the Weekend

 TAGS:undefinedThe weekend is coming up and you’re just waiting to vent out the stress you’ve been accumulating during a hard week of work. So, nothing is better than a night’s out with friends for tasting some amazing cocktails to feel the groove of the party from the inside. Here you can find some recipes of the best cocktails with vodka on earth:

White Russian

A classic cocktail very easy to make

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. Smirnoff No. 21
  • 0.75 oz. Godiva Mocha Liqueur
  • 2 oz. heavy cream

Preparation:

  1. Mix the vodka and liqueur in an old-fashioned glass
  2. Fill the glass with ice
  3. Stir the mix
  4. Top it off with the heavy cream
  5. Serve 

Black Russian

The ‘dark’ version of the White Russian, is another classic one

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 parts vodka
  • 1 part coffee liqueur

To make it you just have to build it in a rocks glass, add ice cubes, and stir. You can even add some cherries to give more flavour to the cocktail.

Dirty Martini

The “dirty” in the name comes from the olive brine and muddled olives used to make it

Ingredients:

  • 2 parts Grey Goose Original
  • 2 parts Noilly Prat Original French Dry Vermouth
  • 4 Mediterranean olives
  • 2/3 part Mediterranean olive brine
  • 2 garnish Mediterranean olives

Preparation:

  1. Pit four olives and muddle them with olive brine in a Boston glass
  2. Add the vodka and vermouth
  3. Top with ice cubes
  4. Stir
  5. Drain the drink into a chilled cocktail glass
  6. Garnish with Mediterranean olives

Caramel Spiced Tea

A nice choice for those who want something a bit different from usual drinks

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. Smirnoff Kissed Caramel
  • 2 oz. strong Chai tea (unsweetened)
  • 1 oz. milk or half & half
  • 0.5 oz. simple syrup

Preparation:

  1. Shake all of the above ingredients with ice
  2. Shake and pour the mixture into a double rocks glass
  3. Drizzle with caramel
  4. Serve

Light Pomegranate Berry Punch

The perfect combination of vodka and red fruits

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. Smirnoff Sorbet Light Raspberry Pomegranate
  • 2 oz. diet ginger ale
  • 1 oz. cranberry juice
  • 1 lime wedge for garnish

Preparation:

  1. Combine the ingredients in a highball glass
  2. Squeeze the lime
  3. Stir
  4. Serve

 

 TAGS:Grey Goose Vodka 1LGrey Goose Vodka 1L

Grey Goose Vodka 1L

 
 
 
 

 TAGS:Smirnoff NorthSmirnoff North

Smirnoff North

Barcelona Restaurants with Ecological Wines

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Ecological wines have been flourishing in all kinds of establishments. To cut short on terminology, we consider that to qualify as an ecological wine, crops require a limitation on sulphates addition and the exclusion of synthetic chemicals (as much as possible).

Today, many restaurants offer these wines as their popularity grows among customers. Here is our selection of Barcelona restaurants with ecological wines, whether you are passing through the city or on vacation.

El Petit Celler

More than a restaurant, El Petit Celler is a sensory experience to taste a variety of wines. They recently opened “Tribut”, a space inside El Petit Celler where you can taste over 250 of the best wines. Beside “Tribut”, you’ll find “La Vermuteria” where you can enjoy a great selection of vermouths accompanied by the best preserved and canned food. As it was originally a store, you can still find many bottles to bring home on their endless shelves, including a substantial choice of ecological wines.

La Dentellière

In Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter, this restaurant stands out for its high-quality and locally-produced food (also called “km 0”): eggs from Calaf, rice from the Ebro Delta and, of course, a good wine list from Catalan and Spanish DOs, such as the ecological Mureda, from DO Castilla-La Mancha, both red and white.

Vistro49 Wine Bar y Coctelería at the Ohla Barcelona

The Ohla Barcelona hotel has several gastronomic spaces. The Frenchman Florian David, sommelier at Caelis’ for more than two years, is in charge of the Vistro49. Its extensive list includes ecological wines and little-known winemakers who produce wines that are hidden gems. There, you can also find a wide selection of famous wines and cavas.

Llavor del orígens

It refers to two restaurants in Barcelona, located in two alternative and fashionable neighbourhoods: Gràcia and El Born, both offer slow food menus. In their wine lists you can choose from a wide range of ecological wines, such as the Bouquet d’Alella from DO Alella, made from the autochthonous “Pansa Blanca” grape.

 TAGS:Mureda Organico Chardonnay 2016

Mureda Organico Chardonnay 2016

Mureda Organico Chardonnay 2016 is a white wine made by Mureda from VT Castilla with the best Chardonnay grapes.

 
 
 
 

 TAGS:Raventós D'Alella Pansa Rosada 2016Raventós D’Alella Pansa Rosada 2016

Raventós D’Alella Pansa Rosada 2016, a rosé wine with a blend based on Xarel·lo Vermell.

 

Guy Fawkes Night – Tasty Cocktails

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“Remember, remember the 5th of November…”. This movie quote from the famous film ‘V for Vendetta‘ always played an important role in English history. Every November 5th, people celebrate the Gunpowder plot during the Guy Fawkes night as a memorial for the failed plan of trying to kill King James I.

And what’s a celebration without its signature drink. Therefore, we’ve chosen a few cocktail recipes for you to celebrate the 5th of November properly.

Earl Grey Martini

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp loose-leaf Earl Grey tea
  • 700ml bottle of gin
  • Ice

Preparation:

  1. Put the Earl Grey tea in a large jug. Pour the gin over and stir with a long-handled spoon for about 45 secs.
  2. Strain the gin through a tea strainer over a funnel back into the bottle. You’ll see small particles of leaf still suspended in the gin. Rinse out the jug and, using a coffee filter or some muslin inside the funnel, strain the gin a second time to remove all the particles. This way, the gin will be stable and the flavour won’t change.
  3. To serve, shake or stir over ice – I like how the flavours change as the drink dilutes.

Espresso Martini

Ingredients:

  • 100g golden caster sugar
  • Ice
  • 100ml vodka
  • 50ml freshly brewed espresso coffee
  • 50ml coffee liqueur 
  • 4 coffee beans

Preparation:

  1. Start by making the sugar syrup. Put the caster sugar in a small pan over a medium heat and pour in 50ml water. Stir, and bring to the boil. Turn off the heat and allow the mixture to cool. Put 2 martini glasses in the fridge to chill.
  2. Once the sugar syrup is cold, pour 1 tbsp into a cocktail shaker along with a handful of ice, the vodka, espresso and coffee liqueur.
  3. Shake until the outside of the cocktail shaker feels icy cold then strain into the chilled glasses. Garnish each one with coffee beans if you like.

Sloe Gin

Ingredients:

  • 50ml sloe gin
  • 25ml lemon juice
  • 25ml Gin
  • Ice
  • 100g white caster sugar
  • 1 tbsp juniper berries

Preparation:

  1. Start by making the juniper syrup. Put the sugar in a small saucepan, then add 100ml water and the juniper berries.
  2. Bring to the boil, then take off the heat and gently squash the berries in the liquid using a potato masher. Leave to steep until completely cold, then strain into a sterilised bottle or jar.
  3. Keep in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.
    Put the sloe gin, lemon juice, gin and 2 tsp of the syrup in a cocktail shaker with a few ice cubes.
  4. Shake well and strain into a tumbler filled with crushed ice.
  5. Serve immediately.

Mai Tai

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp white rum
  • 2 tbsp dark rum
  • 2 tbsp triple sec
  • 1 tbsp grenadine
  • 1 tbsp orgeat or almond syrup 
  • juice of half a lime
  • maraschino cherry

Preparation:

  1. Stir all the ingredients together in a jug or shake them in a cocktail shaker.
  2. Put a few cubes of ice in a tumbler.
  3. Pour the liquid and garnish with a cherry.

 

Rioja vs Ribera

TAGS:undefinedAt first sight, the issue might appear trivial, however, several customers recently asked me the following question: “What is the difference between the wines from the Rioja and those from the Ribera del Duero?”. What’s more, according to my experience, the next question tends to concern the price difference. This is why I thought an article would be the ideal opportunity to come back on the topic, especially considering that Christmas is at the door and we should be thinking about which wine to open during the holiday season.

The most famous Designations of Origin in Spain and those whose wines sell best are, beyond any doubt, the Rioja and the Ribera del Duero. Their red wines are famous not only in Spain but worldwide. Each receives a fervent support from their amateurs whose positions hardly seem compatible. But what are the differences between these regions’ red wines? In order to answer, I have to go through some of the “boring” differences … Before getting to the interesting part!

The creation

La Rioja has been a Designation of Origin (Denominación de Origen, DO) since 1925 and even received the “Denominación de Origen Calificada, DOC” in 1991, which implies an excellent quality. On the other hand, the Ribera del Duero is a relatively new DO as it was only recognized in 1982.

The geographical situation

The Rioja  DOC’s production area is located in Northern Spain on the banks of the Ebro river, mainly in the autonomous communities of the Rioja and the Basque Country. Moreover, the region is subdivided into three geographical designations: Rioja Alta, Rioja Alavesa and Rioja Baja. All in all, the DO counts 63.593 hectares of vineyards producing between 280 and 300 million litres (90% of red, 5% of white and 5% of rosé).

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The production area of the Ribera del Duero DO stretches over the south-east of Castile and León, mostly in the provinces of Burgos, Segovia, Valladolid and Soria. There are 22.320 hectares of vineyards which produce about 130 million litres (98% of red and 2% of rosé).

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Regarding the geographical situation, it is not so much the formal delimitation between the various areas that matters but rather their soils or “terroir” as well as their respective climate. The soils and the climate determine the wine quality among other factors.

As to the Rioja DOC, generally speaking for the three production areas, the climate is continental, moderate, and almost Mediterranean in the Rioja Baja’s case. The mild temperatures allow for a slow and careful maturation of the grapes. The designation is characterized by a diversity of soils, though clay-calcareous, clay-ferrous and alluvial types of soil predominate.

Typical for the Ribera del Duero DO is the extreme continental climate along with scarce rainfalls. Winters are cold with icy winds whereas summers are hot and dry but with low nocturnal temperatures. As a result, the grape ripens faster and is more concentrated. Soils are rather diverse in this DO even if limestone prevails.

Varieties of grape

The main grape variety grown in both DOs is the Tempranillo but that is where their similarity ends. Indeed, in the Rioja, the allowed red varietals include the Tempranillo (the most common), the dark Grenache, the Carignan and the Graciano as well as three white varietals: the Malvasia, the Macabeu and the white Grenache.

In the Ribera del Duero, red varieties include the Tempranillo, also called locally Tinto  Fino or Tinta del País, the Cabernet, the Sauvignon, the Merlot and the Malbec. Additionally, they have a small amount of Grenache and, for whites, the Albillo.

Although the Tempranillo is the most commonly grown and used varietal in the elaboration of wines from both DOs, their wines remain truly different.

Aroma, power in the mouth, alcohol and alcohol level, colour and savour

In short, red wines from the Rioja can be described as sweet and hardly astringent. They do not leave a dry feeling in the mouth and are not harsh.

Ribera del Duero’s wines are more concentrated and intense both in their colour and their savour thanks to the extreme climate and the grape’s quicker maturation. They give a sensation of greater astringency, dryness and harshness in the mouth. They can be described as powerful.

For the same reasons as their power in the mouth, wines from the Ribera de Duero have a higher level of alcohol than those from the Rioja. Though, if the wines are well elaborated, one does not necessarily notice their higher alcohol content.

The Rioja wines’ aroma reminds us of red fruits and they leave a fresh aftertaste thanks to their acidity. The aroma of the Ribera del Duero wines calls ripe fruits to mind, appears smoother and rounder in the mouth and tends to end with a lactic hint, similar to a strawberry yoghurt.

Both DOs classify their wines according to their time of ageing in barrels or bottles (Crianza):

  • Joven / Roble (they do not age in wooden barrels neither do they mature in barrels for more than 12 months)
  • Crianza (minimum two years of ageing, one of which in a barrel)
  • Reserva (minimum three years of ageing, one in a barrel and the other in bottle)
  • Gran Reserva (minimum five years of ageing, two in a barrel and three in bottle)

The graph below shows the ageing potential of wines over time according to their “Crianza”. For both DOs, young wines should be drunk rapidly, whereas “Crianza” and “Reserva” wines can be savoured over a longer period.

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The boring, yet objective, part is finally over and we can now focus on the more interesting part.

The price difference

Why are Rioja wines generally cheaper than the Ribera del Duero’s? I answered this question to a large extent in my previous explanations: the production area and the number of litres produced in the Rioja is sensibly higher than in the Ribera. Indeed, we still have in mind the Rioja’s 63.593 hectares of vineyards in contrast to “only” 22.320 hectares in the Ribera. Moreover, the climate has a defining influence. Indeed, it is easier to produce wine in the Rioja than under the Ribera’s extreme conditions. The Ribera’s cellars face more frost problems which limit the yields of the vines. Less wine, higher prices!

To summarize, these DOs are different regions with different soils, climates and varietals. So, why do people keep arguing over the superiority of one designation over the other? To each his own tastes, no? Or should I prefer meat over fish?

This being said, some issues and disagreements are brought to light. Nowadays, several estates in the Rioja Alavesa wish to break away from their current DO to create a new one (“D.O. Viñedos de Álava”). Local Alavese winegrowers (about 42) promote the differences and the unique character of their wines. If we consider the French or Italian classification system, their demands would be quite sensible. In 2015, the famous ARTADI Bodega quit the Rioja DO. The winemaker justified his choice declaring, “Renowned wine regions such as Bordeaux (with 52 sub-designations) or Burgundy (96) offer their consumers wines which evoke specific areas. It is essential to provide the consumers with the opportunity to discover our land’s diversity, which grants quality wines their uniqueness and authenticity”.

While they are right to wish for a distinct recognition and to promote their wines’ particularities, I might have some reservations. Indeed, let us not forget that the reputation and the fame of the Rioja wines are the result of its winegrowers’ efforts and dedication, but also the considerable resources deployed by the DOs to support their products’ commercialisation and promotion. It is necessary to thank the DOs for their great work. Yet, it can hardly be otherwise: just like every child will eventually stand on its own feet and trace its own path, winegrowers will aspire to a greater autonomy and step outside the DOs’ framework.

In the Ribera del Duero’s case, the situation is quite different. Here, we talk about those excluded from the DO. Some of the most famous cellars of the Castile and León region such as Mauro, Abadía Retuerta, Bodegas Leda, … Do not belong to the Ribera del Duero DO but to the “Vino de la Tierra de Castilla y León”. Is it a problem? Abadía Retuerta answers, “At Abadía Retuerta, we could say that our auto-regulation is much stricter than other designations. Though our application to the Ribera del Duero was refused, today, we can affirm that this event is one of the secrets of Abadía Retuerta’s success. We are currently in touch with the administration to create our own designation in compliance with the recently voted Wine Law”.

As for Mauro, they are among the best red wines from Spain and acknowledged as such by the greatest critics in the world.

Every day in France, there are more winemakers who decide to break away from the designation of origin and to commercialize their wines under the name of “Vin de France”. It might be time for designations to rebrand or reinvent themselves. A similar situation is happening in Catalonia with the Cava DO where several estates quit their DO but, unlike other regions, they created two classifications: Clàssic Penedès and Cava de Paraje.

But let’s get back to our DOs: Would it be more sensible or relevant to distinguish Modern vs Classical wines? Are the former better than the latter?

It would like asking whether one prefers our grandmother’s traditional recipes or sushi … Wouldn’t it be possible to enjoy both? These are two totally different types of vinification and we shouldn’t compare them.

The so-called modern wines are usually more full-bodied and fleshy, they also have a greater intensity as well as a greater power and a higher alcohol content. These wines undergo their ageing process in new barrels (my best friends …). At first, it might sound unsavoury, but nothing is further from the truth! These wines’ problem is that they are drunk too soon, too young. They must remain in their bottle for 10 years before consumption in order to let them balance themselves and achieve their ideal drinking point. They should not be consumed too soon.

On the contrary, classical wines, my personal favourite, are left for a long period of time in used barrels, that is, in barrels previously used to mature other wines. The wood’s influence on the wine quality decreases and the wine becomes smoother. Moreover, once bottled, the wines are stocked in cellars for some time before commercialisation. For example, Viña Tondonia, La Rioja Alta, Vega Sicilia are wines bearing a tile colour with an evolved nuance and a very agreeable mouth.

Actually, the Rioja vs Ribera distinction does not really make sense. There are safe bets in both DOs, indispensable great wines and small cellars to give them a novel distinction. When well elaborated, a good wine with its own character can be found in every cellar and suit every pocket.

This being said, the wine landscape in Spain has tremendously changed over a short period of time. Some smaller regions unveil an incredible and fantastical potential thanks to a new generation of winegrowers who travelled, studied and worked in Spain or abroad with great winemakers. This generation shows a clear will to develop their vineyards, autochthonous varietals and quality wines which deserved to be known, and of course, enjoyed.

TAGS:Campo Viejo TempranilloCampo Viejo Tempranillo

Campo Viejo Tempranillo, a red wine from Rioja that is based on Tempranillo grapes.

 

TAGS:Pruno 2014

Pruno 2014

Pruno 2014, a red wine from Ribera del Duero vinified with cabernet sauvignon and tinta fina.

Choose Your Halloween Cocktail

 TAGS:undefinedYou can bet that Halloween is one of the funniest days of the year. Celebrating the night of the dead has become a worldwide phenomenon. Coming from an ancient Celtic harvest festival, the Gaelic festival Samhain, this festival has probably pagan roots, and is celebrated on October, 31st. To make your Halloween party even better, we have prepared you a few cocktails. Face the night that never ends with colourful drinks.

Sweet Poison

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. light rum
  • 2 oz. coconut rum
  • 1 oz. Blue Curacao
  • 1 handful ice
  • pineapple juice
  • pineapple wedge

Preparation:

  1. Combine both rums and Blue Curacao in a cocktail shaker filled with ice.
  2. Shake, then pour into a cocktail glass
  3. Fill the rest of the glass with chilled pineapple juice.
  4. Garnish with a pineapple wedge.

Zombie Cocktail

  • 1 oz. light rum
  • 1 oz. dark rum
  • 1 oz. apricot liquor
  • 2 oz. orange juice
  • 1 dash lime Bitters
  • 1 handful ice
  • 1 oz. Bacardi 151 Rum
  • orange slice and cherry

Preparation:

  1. Combine light rum, dark rum, apricot liquor, orange juice, and bitters using a cocktail shaker.
  2. Pour into a large glass filled with ice.
  3. Top with the shot of Bacardi 151
  4. Garnish with the orange slice and cherry.

Good and Evil

Ingredients

  • 1 oz. vodka
  • 1 oz. Apple Pucker
  • 1 oz. Midori
  • 1 oz. triple sec
  • 1 handful ice
  • pineapple juice
  • Sierra Mist
  • lemon slice

Preparation:

  1. Combine vodka, Apple Pucker, Midori, and Triple Sec in a cocktail shaker filled with ice.
  2. Shake.
  3. Pour the mixture into a cocktail glass
  4. Top with pineapple juice and Sierra Mist.
  5. Garnish with a slice of lemon

Bloody Black Currant Punch

Ingredients:

  • 1¼ c. brandy
  • ¼ c. sugar
  • 4 c. black currant nectar
  • 1½ c. cold seltzer

Preparation:

  1. Stir brandy and sugar in a large bowl.
  2. Add nectar
  3. Stir to combine.
  4. Refrigerate until cold, about 1 hour.
  5. Add seltzer just before serving.

 

 TAGS:Ron Barceló AñejoRon Barceló Añejo

Ron Barceló Añejo

 
 
 
 
 

 TAGS:De Kuyper Curacao BlueDe Kuyper Curacao Blue

De Kuyper Curacao Blue

Best Drinks for Autumn

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Humid air, cold winds, rainfalls….love it or hate it, but autumn is inevitable. But in order to stand the cold weather, you just need the right drinks. 

Cocktails

Although in summer the most refreshing and citrusy drinks tend to win, in the autumn, gin tonics and long drinks that mix vodka, Cointreau or whisky with sweeter creams and juices are usually preferred at this time of year. When the cold comes, you will want one of them for sure.

Rosé wine

Yes, in addition to spring and summer, rosé wine is still a drink that can be consumed before the toughest cold. Especially for light dishes, such as salads, pasta, rice or chicken and other more powerful like stews, because they offer a refreshing touch that we still need.

Red wine

It is one of the drinks par excellence of the autumnal months. You can really drink it all year long, but with meats and fish, and spoon dishes, it is the best option to get warm and appreciate the nuances of sauces, herbs and spices.

Tea

Because it is warm and when the hard work of autumn comes we need a good boost. Tea recharges our batteries and at the same time, it relaxes us, in order to avoid unnecessary stress as winter gets near.

Stout and craft beer

Lager beer is perfect for the heat, but in autumn we recommend toasted, black and artisan beers. Each one brings a different flavour and they are usually are consistent and rich, giving us the energy that we lack these days.

Vermouth

It is the all-time classic that gains relevance when we meet with friends or co-workers again. Ideal as an appetizer, an after-work talk, with tapas… whatever it may be, vermouth is the right choice for this time of year.

3 Amazing Combinations of Wine & Food

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Eating is not only a ritual for satisfying our stomach or take energies to go through the daily routine but is, above all, a moment of enjoying flavours and tastes that brings happiness. The pairing between food and a drink is an amazing explosion of senses. So here we recommend you three nice recipes of dishes that you can perfectly enjoy with a good wine.

Balsamic Grilled Flank Steak and Arugula Salad

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 lb flank steak
  • 3 Tbs, 3 tsp balsamic vinegar, separated
  • 6 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 tsp dijon
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp chopped shallot
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp pepper
  • 1 pint of cherry tomatoes
  • 5 oz arugula
  • ½ lb Beecher’s Flagship cheddar cheese

Preparation:

  1. Whisk together the 3 Tbs balsamic vinegar, 6 Tbs olive oil, dijon, garlic, shallot, salt, and pepper. Place steak in a zip lock bag, pour balsamic mixture over, seal airtight and refrigerate overnight or 8 hours.
  2. Heat grill and then place marinated steak on the grill top. Grill each side of the steak for 5 minutes, turning 90 degrees after 2 ½ minutes to create a diamond mark on the steak. When the steak has been grilled for a total of 10 minutes or is the temperature of 140 degrees, pull from the grill.
  3. rush with 3 tsp of balsamic vinegar, season with salt, then cover and let rest for 10 minutes. While steak is resting grate Beecher’s cheese and slice cherry tomatoes in half. Cut the steak into thin slices and serve over a bed of arugula.
  4. Garnish with cherry tomatoes, Beecher’s cheese, a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, and freshly cracked pepper.

Italian Sausage Soup

  • 1 pound Italian sausage
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 (14 ounces) cans of beef broth
  • 1 (14.5 ounces) can of Italian-style stewed tomatoes
  • 1 cup sliced carrots
  • 1 (14.5 ounces) can of great Northern beans undrained
  • 2 small zucchini cubed
  • 2 cups spinach – packed rinsed and torn
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Preparation:

  1. In a stockpot or Dutch oven, brown sausage with garlic. Stir in broth, tomatoes and carrots, and season with salt and pepper. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer 15 minutes.
  2. Stir in beans with liquid and zucchini. Cover, and simmer another 15 minutes, or until zucchini is tender.
  3. Remove from heat, and add spinach. Replace lid allowing the heat from the soup to cook the spinach leaves. Soup is ready to serve after 5 minutes.

Baked Dijon Salmon

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup melted butter
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard 
  • 1,1/2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/4 cup dry breadcrumbs 
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped pecans 
  • 4 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley 4
  • (4 ounces) fillets salmon
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 lemon

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
  2. In a small bowl, stir together butter, mustard, and honey. Set aside. In another bowl, mix together bread crumbs, pecans, and parsley.
  3. Brush each salmon fillet lightly with honey mustard mixture, and sprinkle the tops of the fillets with the breadcrumb mixture.
  4. Bake salmon 12 to 15 minutes in the preheated oven, or until it flakes easily with a fork.
  5. Season with salt and pepper, and garnish with a wedge of lemon.

 TAGS:Dom Pérignon Vintage luminous label 2009Dom Pérignon Vintage luminous label 2009

Dom Pérignon Vintage luminous label 2009 is a sparkling wine made by Moët & Chandon from the region of Champagne vinified with pinot noir and chardonnay from 2009 and has an alcoholic content of 12.5%.

 

 TAGS:Vidigal Porta 6 2016Vidigal Porta 6 2016

Vidigal Porta 6 2016 is the product of the fertile vineyards from Alenquer and Cadaval, in the mountains in the North of Lisbon.