Tag: pinot noir

Portugal as a land of wine: the wine regions of Lisboa and Ribatejo

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The district of Lisbon has always been present in the history of wine culture of Portugal. Much of the production of white wines of Bucelas (Denomination of Origin region from 1911 until today) regularly travelled to English court.

In Colares (near Sintra), there are the country’s oldest vines. After several decades falling into oblivion, the Adega Cooperativa de Colares has developed and boosted its production. Here there are produced “crianzas” (4 years required), open coloured and approximately 12.5% alcohol content. The main grapes are Ramisco, in red wines, and the delicate Malvasia, in white wines. Anyone who has had the opportunity to taste the wines from this area certainly have noticed that they are a little jewel in terms of body and very special aroma.

Another wine region that shares territory with the Tagus river is Ribatejo, known for its generous wine production for the domestic market, thanks to large areas of flat terrain and temperate climate, which once supplied the Portuguese colonies in Africa.

From the 80s the Ribatejo vineyards have undergone major restructuring, coming from its cellars themselves, now with stainless steel tanks -before concrete-, oak barrels for aged wines, and even the production legislation of regional wines, which allows the use of strains not admitted by the DO, which consequently opens a wide range of possibilities to create new wines.
The traditional strains are many: Periquita and Castelão Nacional are the queens of the reds, while for the whites they usually use Fernão Pires and Arinto, among others. But the vineyard restructuring has allowed the introduction of international strains such as Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Merlot and Syrah, with excellent results. Their white wines are fruity and with floral aromas, and reds are aromatic with soft tannins.

Also in Lisbon there is a great wine production with the strain Periquita, in addition to Touriga Nacional and others. The Lourinhã region develops excellent aged spirits and just off, in Óbidos (Leiria district) they produce a very aromatic liqueur, garnet red, called Ginginha de Óbidos, and some varieties have aromas of cinnamon or vanilla. Carcavelos wines, the smallest Portuguese wine region, are syrupy, age very well and have a topaz colour and aroma of almonds.

Arruda dos Vinhos – Lisbon (also called “Ruta de vinos” or wine route) produce some of the best wines in the region, maintaining its quality for over 50 years. The reds are robust, garnet red and whites are light, straw or citrine coloured.

Since the choice is difficult… our recommendations for today are more than two : )

From the Lisbon district:

From Ribatejo we offer a white wine and a red wine. The first is the result of the union between the traditional Fernão Pires with Sauvignon Blanc; the second is born from Touriga Nacional and Syrah.

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Chocapalha 2010: a red wine with this DO: Lisbon with a blend based on the 2010 grapes and 13º of alcohol strength.

 

 

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Casal Santa Maria Sauvignon Blanc 2014: a white wine Lisbon based on sauvignon blanc of 2014 and has a volume of alcohol of 13º. 

 

 

*Article originally published by Rita Bonet at O Blog de Uvinum

The 5 world best sellers Sancerre wines

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Sancerre wine is known worldwide for its taste, its good value for money and how well you can work the Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir. In France it is one of the most demanded wines, but do you know which Sancerre wines are the most sold abroad? Today we show you the five Uvinum best-selling Sancerre wine worldwide:

5. Vacheron Belle Dame 2007

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Vacheron Belle Dame 2007, a great Sancerre wine

 

 

 4. Alphonse Mellot Génération XIX Blanc 2007

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Alphonse Mellot Génération XIX Blanc 2007, a good value for money 

 

3. Alphonse Mellot Génération XIX 2005

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Alphonse Mellot Génération XIX 2005, you will be surprised by this tremendous wine

 

 

2. Saget Blanc 375ml 2009

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Saget Blanc 375ml 2009, don’t miss this Sancerre wine!

 

 

1. Pierre Archambaut Rosé 2009

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Pierre Archambaut Rosé 2009, this is the best seller ! Try it too!

Pinot Noir, an elegant grape

Pinot Noir grapesOriginal Pinot Noir wines come from the city of BurgundyFrance. It is one of the grapes with more importance in the preparedness of champagne and other sparkling wines, as well as a solo wine variety. Many of the most famous and expensive wines are made from the Pinot Noir.

This strain is as capricious as excellent in taste and elegance, as it is almost developed exclusively in cold climates, highlighting its production in countries like France, Spain, Australia, South Africa, Argentina and the region of California. The Pinot Noir has small berries, soft flesh and a purplish black. 

More about Pinot Noir: 

Pinot Noir wines are undoubtedly fine wines and tend to have a structure where the tannins highlight. It has a very subtle flavor in the mouth, fresh and fruity nuances, with an acidity that keeps it “alive”, without being aggressive on the palate: a good bouquet, in the end.

The nose – the Pinot Noir wine is one of the most aromatic of all the strains, a fact to add to its excellence. Immediately jumps to your nose the berry aromas such as strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, plums and cherries. We can also distinguish aromas of leather, licorice and violet, these last aromas are given when wines are aged in oak. And we can reduce primary flavors such as black currant and truffles.

Sight: Pinot Noir has a unique color, featuring a slightly opaque red brick, with a luminous glow unique among all wines. Like almost all the wines, the color changes with the ageing, if a young Pinot Noir is red ruby or purple; an 8 or 10 years old wine will show an ocher orange color.

The perfect pairing

Pinot Noir wines are perfect with poultry such as chicken, goose or duck, especially if they are prepared with spiced herbs and baked; it is also a fancy ally of semi-hard cheeses. Pinot Noir wine can be perfectly paired with fishes such as tuna and salmon, and some freshwater fish, always prepared with grace or steamed. Always remember that the wine should not overshadow the food and vice versa. 

Pinot Noir wine should be served at room temperature between 14 and 15 degrees. If the wine is over 8 years the ideal temperature is 15 degrees and sometimes depending on the marriage, at 16 degrees. 

If you want to try the excellence of the Pinot Noir, we suggest 3 different wines who will help you learn all about this grape: 

  • Codorniu Pinot Noir Rosse: A pink champagne made exclusively from Pinot Noir, which combines the freshness of the cava and the mineral character of the Pinot Noir. It’s Excellent. 
  • Nicolas Potel Chambertin Grand Cru 2006: Premier Cru Burgundy, Pinot Noir to appreciate as their interpretation of the grape it in Burgundy. An essential one.
  • Enrique Mendoza Pinot Noir 2006: Aldo Pinot Noir grapes are used to cold weathers, in Alicante Enrique Mendoza has achieved this marvelous wine. Different. 

What do you say? What is the last interesting Pinot Noir that you have tryed?

Twitter’s Fledgling Wine launches

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In an exciting convergence of technology, CSR, and wine, yesterday Twitter launched it’s first wine, called Fledgling Wine. The 2009 vintage includes a Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, sourced from “top-flight California vineyards”, crushed at San Francisco’s DIY custom crush facility Crushpad, and on sale on $25 a bottle, but probably the most interesting thing about the wine is where your money goes. $5 from every bottle will be used to promote literacy in Uttarakhand, India through the non-profit Room to Read organization. It’s part of Twitter’s declared larger effort to increase access to information and use open communication to bring about positive change, and as the company points out, ” if you can’t read you can’t Tweet!” In true Twitter style the winemaking process has been shared with users along the way, allowing them to participate in the process. 

Supporting educational efforts simply by enjoying your wine seems like an attractive idea to me…find out more about Fledgling Wine or buy a bottle here

When drinking your wine is not enough

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If it is too hot this summer to comfortably enjoy your Cab, you can try it in sorbet form now thanks to Wine Cellars sorbet. Although I’ve seen other wine flavored ice creams and sorbets before, this was the first time I’d come across the company designed soley on this idea. The result is a range from riesling, to pinot noir, to rosé or port…all made with actual wine, though they are non-alcoholic. In my mind this opens up all kinds of interesting possibilities, like a frozen version of brunch- Heston Blumenthal style bacon and egg ice cream paired with mimosa sorbet, for example, or gazpacho sorbet and sangria sorbet for a Spanish themed lunch…

If you don’t have access to these sorbets, you can try your hand at making one with only water, sugar, and your choice of wine. Let me know how they turn out!