Tag: restaurant

The sky above English gastronomy is full of Michelin stars

 TAGS:undefinedThe publication of the new Michelin Guide for Great Britain and Ireland is always a highlight for fans of gastronomy, famous chefs and the best restaurants. London is one of the best rated cities world wide for culinary art and year after year is awarded various Michelin stars.

Of the 17 new entries in the Michelin Guide for London 2016, there are 15 restaurants awarded 1 star and 2 new restaurants awarded 2 stars: The Japanese restaurants Araki and Umu both gained 2 stars.

The sushi restaurant Araki, which opened its doors in Mayfair last summer, asks £ 300 per person for its omakase menu. It is supervised by chef Mitsuhiro Araki, who closed a three-Michelin starred restaurant in Tokyo in 2013 to open this one in London.

“It is a big compliment to London, that Sushi master Mitsuhiro Araki closed his three-starred restaurant in Tokyo to go to the United Kingdom and challenge himself in a different culture”, says Rebecca Burr, editor of the Michelin Guide.

Umu is a very different kind of Japanese restaurant. Its chef Yoshinor Ishii has constantly improved his cooking and brought it to a completely new level.”

Four more London restaurants were awarded one star, one of them is the modern British restaurant Lyle’s of James Lowe in Shoreditch, furthermore, Bonhams in Mayfair, The Portland in Regent Park and the restaurant of the Goring hotel in Victoria.

Among the one-star-winning restaurants outside London there are the Carters of Moseley in the West Midlands, the Gravetye Manor in West Sussex, The Man Behind the Curtain in West Yorkshire, John’s House in Leicestershire, Woodpeen in West Berkshire and the House of Tides in Tyne and Wear.

In Scotland The Cellar in Anstruther gained 1 star, just as Eipic and OX in Belfast, The Greenhouse in Dublin and Loam in Galway. 13 restaurants lost their outstanding Michelin-star qualification, among them Gordon Ramsay’s Maze in Mayfair, formerly led by  Jason Atherton, and the Indian restaurant Rasoi in Chelsea.

Be it as it may, London’s cooking is on top of the world and the city’s best restaurants have thrown their hats in the ring for the title of the World’s Best Restaurant, at the moment hold by the great El Celler de Can Roca.

 TAGS:Coto de Imaz Reserva 2010Coto de Imaz Reserva 2010

Coto de Imaz Reserva 2010: a red wine from the Rioja DO with a blend based on tempranillo of 2010 and has a volume of alcohol of 13.5º.

 

 

 TAGS:Castle Of Dracula Marsecco Red Delle Venezie Vino Frizzante SemiseccoCastle Of Dracula Marsecco Red Delle Venezie Vino Frizzante Semisecco

Castle Of Dracula Marsecco Red Delle Venezie Vino Frizzante Semisecco: a sparkling wine from the Veneto DO and with an alcohol content of 10.5º. 

 

 

What will be the best restaurants in the world?

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A new edition of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, sponsored by S. Pellegrino and Acqua Panna, will return to the historic Guildhall in London for a prestigious ceremony.

The awards provide an annual snapshot of the global gastronomic scene; they are a recognized and respected benchmark which shows the main trends and remarkable culinary treasures from all corners of the Earth.

In 2014, 49 of the 50 restaurants in the list attended the gala event. This time the Noma restaurant in Copenhagen regained the title of S. Pellegrino World’s best restaurant.

This year, for the first time, the top 50 restaurants in the world will be working with professionals in consulting services from Deloitte as an independent official partner. Deloitte will ensure the integrity and authenticity of the voting process and the resulting list of the 50 best restaurants in the world 2015 will become protected.

William Drew, editor of the top 50 restaurants in the world Group, said: “We are very pleased to confirm the date of the awards for the World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2015 on Monday, June 1st”.

“As always, we strive to ensure that the results reflect the current global gastronomic scene, with a system that allows members to vote throughout the world, from small and unknown restaurants in remote areas to some of the best known restaurants in the world”, said Drew.

“This year, we are delighted to introduce the worldwide renowned consulting firm Deloitte as an independent judge to validate the voting process and the resulting list. We believe this is an important step in strengthening the integrity and credibility of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants”, he said finally.

In the ceremony, the top 50 restaurants will be announced, and it will culminate with the coveted award for the S. Pellegrino Best Restaurant in the World. In addition to other awards categories, including Veuve Clicquot World’s Best Female Artist and Diners Club® Life Achievement Award.

The list of the World’s top 50 restaurants will be presented in the company of the best chefs and international media gathered. The list of nominees is created from the votes of the Diners Club® World’s 50 Best Restaurants Academy, an influential group of nearly 1,000 international leaders in the gastronomic community.

The Academy has 27 separate regions around the world. Each region has 36 members, including a president, and each member can cast seven votes. Of the seven, at least 3 votes go to restaurants outside the region of the member itself.

 

 TAGS:M. Chapoutier Bila Haut L'Esquerda 2013M. Chapoutier Bila Haut L’Esquerda 2013

M. Chapoutier Bila Haut L’Esquerda 2013: a red wine from the Côtes du Roussillon Villages DO with the best bunches of 2013 syrah and grenache and presents an alcohol content of 14º.

 

 

 TAGS:Veuve Clicquot BrutVeuve Clicquot Brut

Veuve Clicquot Brut: a sparkling wine with Champagne DO made with pinot Noir and pinot Meunier and with an alcohol proof of 12º. 

 

 

* Picture: Angelo Amboldi (flickr)

BYOB comes to London

https://www.uvinum.co.uk/blog/assets/uploads/sites/3/2010/07/733582-270759.jpgHaving usually been allowed to bring a special bottle of wine if I so chose to a nice restaurant as long as I was willing to pay a corkage fee, it was not until recently that it occurred to me that this could be considered a privilege and not a right. It was not actually until my first day at Uvinum that I learned that this was not a common practice in Spain, and since then I have noticed the online wine world has been commenting on a new BYOB (bottle in this case, not beer) club in London. Started by Christopher and Khadine Johnson-Rose, the idea is to pay an annual fee in exchange for permission to bring a bottle from your own collection to the restaurants on the list, most fine dining, and some of them among the big names in London’s restaurant scene such as Tom Aikens and The Ledbury, both which have Michelin stars. Restaurants can still place restrictions, such as limiting it to lunch or certain days of the week, however, or charge small additional fees. 

It’s a tricky one for restaurants as they make a substantial margin on wine sold in house, though they tend to cite service as the reason behind the big markups. It is true that a nice restaurant with a sommelier needs to pay that salary, but it is not the same rationale that can be claimed for food. There is no transformation with the product in question as there is with food in the kitchen; the server or sommelier, other than helping a guest select a wine, just needs to open and pour the bottle. This is still very important, but it is likely something that can be covered in a corkage charge. 

I have to admit I am biased coming from a place where this is not unusual, particularly in my hometown of San Francisco. Yet we also normally have a few unofficial rules:

  • Bring a special bottle (not a cheap one).
  • Never bring something that is on the restaurant’s wine list.
  • It is always nice to also buy a glass to start with from the restaurant, or another bottle depending on the size of the group. 

Despite the fact that bringing a bottle is frequently permitted in the US, the majority of customers chose not to. After all, selecting a wine is often one of the best parts of eating out. So I don’t think restaurants in other countries have much to fear. It simply allows their guests additional options. And for some diners, there can certainly be financial incentives to bring a bottle- they can often drink a nicer bottle than if they had to order one. Which means for the restaurant, they have more money to spend on food, or justify a dinner out. In this economy, I think that’s a win-win for both sides. 

Who Tastes the Wine?

https://www.uvinum.co.uk/blog/assets/uploads/sites/3/2010/07/692968-268852.jpgOrdering wine in a restaurant apparently not only creates confusion for the diner (which region? varietal? price? does it go with fish?), but also the sommelier. There’s already been some discussion as to which person at the table should receive the wine list, but now a new debate is emerging thanks to Eric Asimov’s recent article in the New York Times. The question now is, do you want the sommelier to taste your wine before you? (Or at all?)

 

On the pro side we have strong points made by blogger Alder Yarrow and many sommeliers, that this is one of the original purposes of the sommelier, and the reason they traditionally wore tastevins around their necks- to ensure the wine they were serving was a)not poisoned (thankfully not usually a problem these days), and b)not flawed (very much still an issue). They argue that part of a sommelier’s job is to ensure a pleasant experience, one which does not include a mouthful of corked wine. 

However, there is also a vocal contingent of mostly wine savvy consumers, who believe they are just as equipped as a sommelier to decide if the wine is in good shape or not, or take offense to the idea that the restaurant is essentially helping themselves to what the customer has paid for, akin to a server taking a bite of their food. 

Flawed wine remains a problem, and the reality is not all consumers are educated or confident enough to make that call. Furthermore, different diners have different ideas about what constitutes a great dining experience. Some enjoy the ceremony of the corking, decanting, and tasting of a fine wine on a big night out, others like Alder declare…“I’m SO OVER the theater of wine. A certain amount of ceremony is fine, but for pete’s sake, let’s just drink the stuff.”

I think the safest answer is for the sommelier to simply to ask the customer if he or she would like them to taste the wine. And you- who do you want to taste your wine?