Tag: rosé

The Perfect Pairing: Bread & Wine

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Bread with cereals, bread with wine, dark bread and bread of diverse flavors. Bread is one of the most important and nutritious foods, and you can never miss at good meal, either to accompany your dish or to make sandwiches.

Although it is a grateful food that goes well with many drinks and easy to accompany with other foods, we must know how to properly combine. Black, rye and cereal breads can be mixed with cheeses, jams and also with pates. They are perfect breads to spread everything you want, especially at breakfast.

The whole wheat bread is also good to sprinkle and to accompany really strong plates and dishes. To make sandwiches with tomatoes and sausages, there are several types of breads, such as the traditional chapata that sausages with ham serrano, chorizo or loin. In the same way that the bread of peas is perfect for tortillas and sandwiches of fuet.

The meat can be combined with a red wine accompanied with candeal bread that presents low humidity, and the Castilian loaf. These breads can also be served with fish, although it is always better with loaves of bread (when bought at the bakery). And bread with paprika is especially for seafood.

Bread with wine presents many alternatives. For example the baguette, the best known and sold bread, usually has a delicate flavor, so white wine is preferred along with cheeses and something stronger to contrast flavors.

Focaccia bread can be combined with red wine and also with very fresh rosé wine. Being a traditionally Italian bread nothing beats combining it with an Italian wine, such as the pink Chianti.

The breads that has raisins, nuts and other fruits go well with the somewhat sweet wines and with the cava or champagne.

 TAGS:Ruffino Chianti Classico Riserva Ducale 2012Ruffino Chianti Classico Riserva Ducale 2012

Ruffino Chianti Classico Riserva Ducale 2012

 

 

 TAGS:Ruffino Chianti 2014Ruffino Chianti 2014

Ruffino Chianti 2014

Unbeatable Parings with Rosé Wine

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Autumn is just around the corner and nothing is more refreshing than a good rosé wine in your balcony feeling the sweet evening breeze. The most ambitious rosés can be paired with various foods that come along with the season. Here are some great advices.

Rosé wine + Meat

Although this wine fits perfectly with fish, pairing it with meat it’s also a very viable option. That is why it is recommended to mix it with pinky sausages and stronger red meats.

On the other hand, if you are having pork for dinner, you can go with a Monastrell rosé. Its fruity taste goes well with barbecued ribs and with any grilled meat.

Seafood

The purest rosé wine is the perfect choice for any seafood. Especially fruity wines because they intensify the powerful flavor of certain seafood.

Fish

In addition to white, rosé wine is one of the best options for all kinds of fish, preferably white. Just pick your favorite one and be delighted.

Cheese

Rosé wine and cheese are good allies. It is recommended to add goat cheese, camembert or brie to enjoy the special similarity of both flavors.

Pasta or salads

Fresh foods like salads, pastas, and even rice can be paired perfectly with rosé because they have a unique softness and freshness that make the dishes a lot tastier.

Fruits

Whereas you are having a delicious dessert or a fruit salad, rosé wine will go very well.

Tuscan rosé wines are better served with pasta and appetizers such as crostini, which is little pieces of toasted bread accompanied by tomato or pâté. Australian wines pair well enough with milder cheeses while Spanish rosés go well with fish and certain meats.

Rosé wine is best if it’s cold, but not too much, so we must take into account the temperature. Really it must be something hotter than white wine cooler than a red wine.

 TAGS:Le Crazy Tropez RoséLe Crazy Tropez Rosé

Le Crazy Tropez Rosé: a rosé wine from the region of Côtes De Provence made of cinsault, syrah and grenache and has an alcoholic content of 12%.

 

 

 TAGS:Miraval Rosé 2015Miraval Rosé 2015

Miraval Rosé 2015: is a rosé wine made by Château Miraval from the region of Côtes De Provence vinified with cinsault, garnacha negra, vermentino, syrah, rolle, garnacha and grenache from 2015 and has an alcoholic content of 13%. 

 

 

4 Myths about Rosé Wine

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Rosé wine is a type of wine with a long tradition in many parts of the world, like France, where it is very well appreciated. In fact, historians agree that it was rosé wine which we began to consume for its peculiar and striking color. There are many rosé wines of very good quality everywhere and you can enjoy just as a good red, with a special pairing and among friends and family. The truth is that there are many myths about this wine today and these will be disclosed and explained.

1. Rosé wine it’s a blend

Contrary to what it is still believed in some places, rosé wine is by no means a mixture of red and white. In fact, such mixtures are banned in some countries because it would detract from quality and property of being a wine. What it makes them to have this sublime color is the kind of maceration they go through, which is very short compared with other types of wine.

2. It is not a real wine

Another big myth that orbit rosé wine is about its quality. A rosé wine can have the same or higher quality than any other wine. They contain the most delicate grapes, more delicate than the ones used in any red, this is because rosé has fewer antioxidants, which help to protect wines from reactions and other contaminants.

3. The rosé wine is for women

We are in 2016, XXI century: who would think that something is specifically for a genre? We must open our minds more on the food side, and try everything. No wine is for women or men nor there are wines for connoisseurs and beginners. If you like a particular wine, enjoy it as you like.

4. They can’t be paired

Totally wrong. Rosé wine can be paired with tapas if you like, although you may preferably choose those that do not contain meat. Also, it is delicious with paella, or any meal based on rice, like Asian food, it can be very well enjoyed and paired with rosé.

Summarizing, and taking in account all the above aspects, rosé wine DEFINITELY is a wine and a very good one, which has great references both in Spain and elsewhere in the world. Discover and enjoy them!

 TAGS:Enate Rosado 2015Enate Rosado 2015

Enate Rosado 2015

 

 

 TAGS:Miraval Rosé 2015Miraval Rosé 2015

Miraval Rosé 2015

 

 

Sancerre’s wines

 TAGS:Sancerre is a wine region on the banks of the Loire. In this region there are numerous hills full of vineyards that form a great landscape. In Sancerre different soils and microclimates enables the cultivation of different varieties for wine production. From 250-400 meters above sea level, this area is characterized by dry winters, reliable rainfall for the months of May and July, and heat in the months of August and September.

The vineyards of Sancerre were created in the Middle Ages. King Henry IV was a lover of good wine. According to the legend, King Henry IV used to say that the local wine was so good, that wars would not have existed if his enemies had tried it. During the nineteenth century the wines of Sancerre, Beaujolais and Côtes-du-rhône were the closest and best-selling wines in Paris. At this time the wine had soft colors and poor concentration, as they were very exhausted to offer larger quantities. This technique led to booming sales of white wines.

The grapes most commonly used to make wines of Sancerre are Sauvignon Blanc for whites and Pinot Noir for reds. In the late nineteenth century were grown Pinot Noir and Gamay for reds and for whites Meslier and Sauvignon. But it was not until after the First World War that the wine country truly developed, replanting the area with Sauvignon.

Until the late 80s and early 90s all Sancerre white wines were fermented and aged bypassing or oak wood barrels. They were carried out in steel tanks without lees for approximately six months before bottling. In recent years, many producers use wood for the fermentation process, producing the best cuvées in the oldest vines. Producers Thomas-Labaille Crochet create late harvest during favorable vintages.

The reds are not very colorful, but they are very aromatic with red fruit, licorice, cinnamon and flower tastes. The pink ones have opened color, aromas of fruit, mint, and pepper.

Want to try wines from Sancerre? We recommend:

 TAGS:Sancerre Saget Rouge 375ml 2009Sancerre Saget Rouge 375ml 2009

Sancerre Saget Rouge 375ml 2009

 

 

 TAGS:Sancerre Pierre Archambaut Rosé 2009Sancerre Pierre Archambaut Rosé 2009

Sancerre Pierre Archambaut Rosé 2009

Buy wine for tapas

 TAGS:Buy wine for tapas should be at this point our favorite subject, but if it is not, we are still on time to become the Cum Laude of wine choices for starters, that kind of expert who becomes essential at any meeting, whenever there is good food involved. We will choose the best Spanish wines to go with tapas.

The first thing to do is getting straight down to the business. Let?s get inspired with two examples: one sunny day in the Calle Laurel in Logrono or an afternoon at La Latina area in Madrid. Streets full of bars, bars full of people and tapas, glasses of red wine, white wine, rosé and also some beers.

The important thing in tapas and the basic to enjoy an original ?tapeo? are the moment, the conversation and the combination of flavours. Clearly, a Spanish omelet could taste better accompanied by a Gran Reserva or a known Crianza, but it is also true that the wine itself is not fundamental, but an accessory, only one element.

The wine we choose for tapas has to be good, it has to taste good and has to be consistent with the tapas that we will have, but it does not need to be expensive. I recommend doing a small selection of inexpensive wines with ten or fifteen affordable ones, in which we will have to include different grape varieties, different backgrounds and multiple red and white wines to choose from. Just in case, we can also include some rosés.

This will be our basic list to choose which wines will go with the tapas. It should often be updated and improved. To do this all the wines on the list must have been tasted before, it is best not to risk. In this way we will also know how to be right in our choice depending on the menu and guests.

It’s easy to find good wines from Rioja for less than 10 euros: El Coto, Ramón Bilbao, Cune, Luis Cañas, Vina Albina, Viña Herminia Excelsus, Beronia or Azpilicueta. Many wines are around 6 euros what means that success is guaranteed in return for very little investment.
La Planta, Protos, Prado Rey or any of Pago de los Capellanes are red wines from Ribera del Duero that may be on our table from 6 euros to just over 8.

We cannot ignore in our list wine regions as Penedes, Extremadura, Toro, Jumilla, etc … So, in our selection of inexpensive wines we have to include wonders like Habla del Silencio 2010, Erumir Crianza 2006, Finca Constancia 2009, Martúe 2008, Prima 2009 or Gotim Bru 2008. In addition to their low price these are some extraordinary wines.

As for buying white wines, I can sum up my choices in Albariño and Verdejo, with some contributions to the list of Txacolís, wines from Catalunya and wine of Cadiz, a land of which I have great memories: Protos Verdejo, José Pariente Verdejo, Blanc Pescador Premium, Txomin Etxainz Txacoli, Txacoli Eizaguirre, Martin Códax, Barbadillo Castillo de San Diego and Oda Blanc.

Finally one of the pink wines I usually have, if given the chance to take them: Marqués de Riscal Rosado, Peñascal Rosado Aguja and Enate. I am waiting for your contributions to my list!

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Blanc Pescador, the jewel from Catalonian Coast to share with fish tapas.

 

 

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Palacio de Monsalud, a red wine to pair with meats.

When drinking your wine is not enough

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If it is too hot this summer to comfortably enjoy your Cab, you can try it in sorbet form now thanks to Wine Cellars sorbet. Although I’ve seen other wine flavored ice creams and sorbets before, this was the first time I’d come across the company designed soley on this idea. The result is a range from riesling, to pinot noir, to rosé or port…all made with actual wine, though they are non-alcoholic. In my mind this opens up all kinds of interesting possibilities, like a frozen version of brunch- Heston Blumenthal style bacon and egg ice cream paired with mimosa sorbet, for example, or gazpacho sorbet and sangria sorbet for a Spanish themed lunch…

If you don’t have access to these sorbets, you can try your hand at making one with only water, sugar, and your choice of wine. Let me know how they turn out! 

The Arrival of Wine-in-a-glass

Wine-in-a-glass

The introduction at Marks & Spencer of Le Froglet’s Wine-in-a-glass, an individual serving of either Chardonnay, Rosé, or Shiraz in a covered plastic glass has spurred a great deal of online discussion. Part of the story is the owner of the idea, Mr. James Nash, had his vision unkindly shot down by the BBC’s Dragon’s Den panel, who have been evidentially been proven wrong as Marks & Spencer reportedly cannot keep the glasses in stock.

However, some commenters have decried the environmental impact of the single use glasses, which is valid, but why should wine not be permitted in single use containers when so many other beverages are? (Target in the US offers more environmentally friendly single use wine tetrapacks, kind of like grown up juice boxes, but that concept hasn’t taken off yet.) And some seem offended by the very idea, that it’s déclassé and  “unromantic”.

Wine has survived the introduction of wine cooler and white zinfandel, so I doubt it will suffer at the hand of a plastic glass. If anything, it’s one more way for wine lovers to enjoy the product– and what’s wrong with that?